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cayenne

Is there a compromise?

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Been around W30 for a couple years now-done several months in a row with good results overall but find it difficult on a couple levels. Overall, the philosophy of meat, veggies, some fruit and fat are sound ones and I stick to that most of the time. Still overweight, though. Healthy other than that.

Anyway, as I get older, I struggle with the ethical side of eating meat. If it came down to it, no way would I be the one pulling the trigger to put the animal on my plate. These is no way I can afford grass fed anything as the sole bread winner, and supporting a disabled husband.

I want to make a contribution to reducing the strain of humans on this planet-I cant quit my job and fight for endangered species.

I know what the W30 views are for vegetarians, etc. I want to give up meat and eggs but I know I probably wont-my husband is diabetic and eating W30 "like' is healthy for him. I feel good most of the time as well. It is just tough dealing with the ethical side. Not trying to stay true 100% to W30, what small changes or compromises could I make that honors both sides of the coin? Eating less meat overall but getting protien needs for overall health, satiety. Eat meat only at one meal? More fat at those other 2 meals, adding a whey protien shake? Eating more eggs? Cholesterol has been really high lately for some reason. I know responces will be fish-fish is great, but trying to steer away from eating anything that was alive and moving.

 

Just trying to find a compromise between good health for me and good health for everything else.

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You're probably not going to like this answer, but how you eat, post-Whole30 is ultimately a personal decision for you.

For you, you might need to experiment with other protein sources besides meat and fish and see how your health fares.  If you go that route, it sounds like you already know that's counter to what Whole30 recommends, but again, do what's best for you, your health and your wallet, and is in line with your ethical beliefs.

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Cayenne, I can't help you with the meat question -- but I just wanted to reassure you that it is perfectly normal for cholesterol levels to rise as we age, and this has a protective effect.  Dr. Perlmutter goes into great detail about the cholesterol issue in his book, Grain Brain.  He dispels the myths about cholesterol and heart disease, he tells all about what cholesterol does, why we have it, and how we'd all die without it.  He also explains how all of the studies are showing that women actually have a greater risk of death overall if our cholesterol is under 200.

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There is nothing ethical about eating corn, soybeans, or wheat. The monoculture approach to raising these crops destroys the environment and wastes the resources of the earth at a rapid rate. Vegetarians don't seem to have much to say about factory farming of plant food, but they have a lot to say about the factory farming of meat. The reality is that all factory farming is awful. I am sorry you cannot afford properly raised meat and poultry, but it is important to know that the protein our bodies need is raised kindly and spiritually on some farms. I guess this does not help you with your dilemma, but to the extent you are influenced by the one-sided propaganda of vegetarians, I want to offer a counter-balance. 

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Thanks...I was not going to add back wheat, or corn, and maybe only legumes on a salad. Had quinoa with my veggies this morning. Going to see if eating meat once daily at lunch will help me feel OK. There are several sides to every story-I suspect even this W30 story has its supporters as well as anti-W30. I suspect I will not feel full for long:). Still keeping the no wheat, corn , soy,  sugar thing going as no one can disagree with that!

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Cholesterol can also be higher after and during weight loss.

 

Another perspective from an interesting farmer I met:

Buying more ethically makes changes across the industry, as it alters demand. He told me this a number of years ago and in my country, free range eggs are more common than cage eggs now (even making it onto some ingredient labels now).

 

Meat's not the only option for changing the world, growing your own veggies, teaching others how to grow veggies, reducing waste, joining an organic co-op (or starting one!), buying direct from local small farmers and even (repeatedly!) asking your local retailers for organic and ethical options, even using more parts of the animal (organs, bones, etc).

 

Eggs are quite a good compromise, they don't hurt the chicken if it's well cared for, you can even raise your own at home. They're also very nutritious.

Also, if pain is of particular concern, oysters have no nervous system and don't feel pain.

There's also more ethical canned fish brands available every year.

 

If you do go vegetarian or vegan, monitor your health, some people feel good in the short term but have issues as time goes on.

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Well, I give up. Didn't feel as energetic reducing meat. So  I added it back for breakfast and lunch. Trying to stay with chicken, turkey, fish at least. I don't have any land for growing my own veggies, but I certainly can go to the farmers market here....although I have frequently seen the supermarket "sticker" on a few apples I have bought. Interesting.

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December 16, 2015


"Eating lettuce is over three times worse in greenhouse gas emissions than eating bacon,"Paul Fischbeck, professor of social and decisions sciences and engineering and public policy, told Carnegie Mellon. "Lots of common vegetables require more resources per calorie than you would think. Eggplant, celery and cucumbers look particularly bad when compared to pork or chicken."


 

The study set out to discover if the obesity epidemic in America is adversely affecting the environment. While it's true that losing weight and eating fewer calories reduces energy use, the USDA's recommendations for healthy eating (lighter on the meat, heavier on fruit and veg) isn't necessarily the best thing for climate change.


http://www.sfgate.com/science/article/Lettuce-worse-than-bacon-for-environment-6699787.php

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Yeah, I find some markets (and stallholders) are better than others.

 

Here we're pretty lucky with some local certified organics.

Some aren't certified though. You might find a local co-op or group which has a list of local farmers.

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Well, damn. Can't win for losing. So frustrating being a conscientious consumer-so many conflicting "reliable" sources. Cant tell what is cherry picked and what isn't. Guess I will just have another glass of wine.....

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So I made it 3 days on eggs, fish once a day only and adding lentils, quinoa and a few black beans to the no wheat, corn, soy, dairy and sugar routine. Feel like the energy level is a bit low but I suspect that will improve. Over all feel better about what I eat but still not certain I can sustain it. 

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Maybe there is some way to purchase grass-fed beef by the cow for cheaper and split it up? I've heard of this before. You can be sure the cattle is ethically farmed, especially if you know the person who owned the cow and buying it straight from them.

 

EDIT: If you can find a local farm maybe can buy chickens too? 

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