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Sweet Potatoes and Butternut Squash - I don't like them!!


kittield

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I am just starting to ramp up for my first whole 30.  I bought the Whole 30 book with recipes and I have noticed that a large portion of the recipes include sweet potatoes and butternut squash and though I have tried them several times I just don't like them (same with pumpkin and several other winter squash, and cooked bell peppers) 

 

What are some foods I can use in place of the above, since they seem to be a pretty big part of the Whole 30 recipes?

Is it bad to sub regular potatoes for the sweet potatoes? 

Can I just throw a summer squash in in place of a winter squash (I know the texture will be different)?

 

I like most other veggies and grow a ton of them in my garden in the summer, so pretty much anything outside the veggies above can work for me.

 

Thanks

~L

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You can find W30 recipes that don't include those. Find other recipes on sites like Well Fed, Nom Nom Paleo, and Whole Life Eating, if the ones in the book are not to your taste -- there are other sites, too, of course, but those have many W30 compliant recipes. Plus, if you are used to cooking vegetables from your own garden, there's a really good chance you can adapt many of your recipes to be compliant. 

 

In recipes where it sounds good to you, you can use regular potatoes instead of sweet potatoes. I'd also encourage you to look around and see if you can find Japanese sweet potatoes, which taste totally different than regular sweet potatoes -- they are harder to find, at least around here, but could give you another option. (This article lists some of the types of sweet potatoes you may be able to find.) And again, if it sounds good to you to use summer squash rather than winter, you can try it -- but winter squashes tend to be starchier and have less liquid in them than summer squashes, which may affect recipes.

 

The main thing that sweet potatoes and winter squashes have in common that you may need to watch is that they're starchy vegetables. Most people seem to feel best if they have a fist-sized serving of starchy vegetables each day -- these could be sweet potatoes or winter squashes, or they could be regular potatoes or root vegetables like carrots, beets, turnips, or rutabagas, or even things like jicama or plantains.   Most people feel best with a serving of one of these each day, some people feel fine without having as much, and some people -- especially those who are very active, are prone to depression or anxiety, or females who are pregnant, nursing, or in the week leading up to her period -- may need a little more. It's just something to keep an eye on. But you should be able to get plenty without having to eat the foods you don't like.

 

Basically, eat a variety of different vegetables, and don't worry about trying to eat ones you really, legitimately have tried and just don't like. 

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x10000000 for japanese sweet potatoes. They're so good that for me they violate the Psychological Good Food rule for me. Can't stop eating them and are almost desserty if I eat alone with ghee! You've been warned :) I find them at Whole Foods and Asian markets. They are more dry than an orange sweet potato, buttery flavor, oh yummy! Another one to look for are white sweet potatoes. Light tan colored skin with light butter colored flesh. Hard to find, I didn't see any at all this summer in my store. 

 

I don't like orange sweet potatoes either, like eating mushy fibery baby food. Blech! Pretty much the same for other winter squashes. But I do find that when chopped up, roasted to brownness in coconut oil, and cooked to be more dry I don't mind them as much. So maybe how you cook those veggies could influence your opinion of them? 

 

Also I like using butternut squash as a soup thickener. 

 

For other FODMAPers reading this, while YMWV orange sweet potatoes need to be avoided or limited. But I've had good luck with Japanese and white variants. 

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    x10000000 for japanese sweet potatoes. They're so good that for me they violate the Psychological Good Food rule for me. Can't stop eating them and are almost desserty if I eat alone with ghee! You've been warned :) I find them at Whole Foods and Asian markets. They are more dry than an orange sweet potato, buttery flavor, oh yummy! Another one to look for are white sweet potatoes. Light tan colored skin with light butter colored flesh. Hard to find, I didn't see any at all this summer in my store. 

     

    I don't like orange sweet potatoes either, like eating mushy fibery baby food. Blech! Pretty much the same for other winter squashes. But I do find that when chopped up, roasted to brownness in coconut oil, and cooked to be more dry I don't mind them as much. So maybe how you cook those veggies could influence your opinion of them? 

     

    Also I like using butternut squash as a soup thickener. 

     

    For other FODMAPers reading this, while YMWV orange sweet potatoes need to be avoided or limited. But I've had good luck with Japanese and white variants. 

     

    Sigh - I LOVE orange sweet potatoes.  One of my most missed foods while on assignment in Asia.  I'll trade you all the local sweet potatoes (Asian varieties) I can get my hands on for some sweet potatoes!

Lol

 

Cheers,

 

-Lauren (GGG)

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For other FODMAPers reading this, while YMWV orange sweet potatoes need to be avoided or limited. But I've had good luck with Japanese and white variants. 

Absolutely this. I rarely touch them these days & they used to be a weekly item on my shopping  list. If I need the 'sweetness' they offer I go for parsnips - which are pretty good mashed in some ghee or coconut milk alongside carrot & turnip to top a cottage pie.....  :wub:

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I love sweet potatoes, except steamed or microwaved, absolutely hate them that way! :)

It's worth trying them cooked a few different ways, especially with different fats.

I prefer my starchy veggies roasted mostly, with olive oil, coconut oil or ghee.

 

Zucchini (courgette) is not as starchy, but I really love it browned, or in soup with bone broth.

I love roasted carrots, but too many tends to start messing with my blood sugar a bit (pokes the sugar dragon).

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You can find W30 recipes that don't include those. Find other recipes on sites like Well Fed, Nom Nom Paleo, and Whole Life Eating, if the ones in the book are not to your taste -- there are other sites, too, of course, but those have many W30 compliant recipes. Plus, if you are used to cooking vegetables from your own garden, there's a really good chance you can adapt many of your recipes to be compliant. 

 

In recipes where it sounds good to you, you can use regular potatoes instead of sweet potatoes. I'd also encourage you to look around and see if you can find Japanese sweet potatoes, which taste totally different than regular sweet potatoes -- they are harder to find, at least around here, but could give you another option. (This article lists some of the types of sweet potatoes you may be able to find.) And again, if it sounds good to you to use summer squash rather than winter, you can try it -- but winter squashes tend to be starchier and have less liquid in them than summer squashes, which may affect recipes.

 

The main thing that sweet potatoes and winter squashes have in common that you may need to watch is that they're starchy vegetables. Most people seem to feel best if they have a fist-sized serving of starchy vegetables each day -- these could be sweet potatoes or winter squashes, or they could be regular potatoes or root vegetables like carrots, beets, turnips, or rutabagas, or even things like jicama or plantains.   Most people feel best with a serving of one of these each day, some people feel fine without having as much, and some people -- especially those who are very active, are prone to depression or anxiety, or females who are pregnant, nursing, or in the week leading up to her period -- may need a little more. It's just something to keep an eye on. But you should be able to get plenty without having to eat the foods you don't like.

 

Basically, eat a variety of different vegetables, and don't worry about trying to eat ones you really, legitimately have tried and just don't like. 

Thanks for the hint on the japanese sweet potatoes.  I have an asian market not to far from my house so I will go search them out when I get bored of my white potatoes. 

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Thanks for the hint on the different varieties of sweet potatoes. I grabbed 2 different kinds and the one's we tried tonight aren't horrible.  Not something I would pick over white potatoes, but I think I can throw them in a hash and not gag!   I still have an Asian variety to try so hopefully they are even better!

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I sliced and roasted up the Japanese variety I got last night for "buns" they are delicious, so what i have learned is that I do indeed like sweet potatoes, just not those orange monstrosities that they sell as the common US variety.  Luckily my local Whole Foods has several varieties and I think I will be roasting some up in the oven as part of a dinner next week.

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I sliced and roasted up the Japanese variety I got last night for "buns" they are delicious, so what i have learned is that I do indeed like sweet potatoes, just not those orange monstrosities that they sell as the common US variety.  Luckily my local Whole Foods has several varieties and I think I will be roasting some up in the oven as part of a dinner next week.

Good for you for continuing to try new foods, even when you thought you didn't like them! That's a really great attitude and I'm here to give you the Internet Award for Courageous Food Experimentation!

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Good for you for continuing to try new foods, even when you thought you didn't like them! That's a really great attitude and I'm here to give you the Internet Award for Courageous Food Experimentation!I 

Thanks, I should tell you about the food I ate in Taiwan....I don't read Chinese so I am still not entirely sure all the things I ate were "food" :-D   I will also give a huge thumbs down to stinky tofu...Anything that smells that bad and is named stinky should not be eaten....even if you students insist that it's the best thing in the world. 

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Thanks, I should tell you about the food I ate in Taiwan....I don't read Chinese so I am still not entirely sure all the things I ate were "food" :-D   I will also give a huge thumbs down to stinky tofu...Anything that smells that bad and is named stinky should not be eaten....even if you students insist that it's the best thing in the world.

Deep fried bugs/frogs/insects in Thailand.. I"m adventurous... except the time my ex tried to make me eat duck webs (which are exactly what you think they are)... that was a big heck no!
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Deep fried bugs/frogs/insects in Thailand.. I"m adventurous... except the time my ex tried to make me eat duck webs (which are exactly what you think they are)... that was a big heck no!

I'm pretty sure I had brain by accident and I've definitely had intestine before, but I don't think i can do bugs, it's just the thought of biting into something crunchy and having the squishy bug guts come out in my mouth!!  Nope, not gonna do it.  I have to draw the line somewhere.  (ok. maybe I'll try roasted crickets, but that's it!!)

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No bug guts... exoskeletons (crickets, beetles etc) don't have a ton of... well... goo... the only weird one was silk worms which were surprisingly fuzzy inside... I didn't enjoy those...

I did have brain this summer made by an extremely talented chef... i would probably try just about anything made by someone who understood food and had a passion for it....

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