TonyG123

Ethyl Butyrate in Ghee

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Hi,

 

this is my first time posting. I'm on Day 20 and it's going amazingly well. I'm actually finding it pretty easy aside from the occasional extra piece of fruit here and there. My question is regarding Ethyl Butyrate in ghee. It seems to be prevalent in a lot of versions here in the UK. It's only 0.01% of the content so very minimal, but is it compliant? 

 

I have a tub at home waiting to be cracked open if it is!

 

 

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As far as I can tell this is fine for the purposes of your Whole30 - it's certainly not on the additives cheat list.

That said, you can buy Ghee in the UK without ethyl butyrate - the KTC brand is available on Amazon, and also Khanum do an EB free variety (which is, of course, more expensive) along side their regular type.

Or you could always try making your own.....?

EB is apparently added to enhance the smell when used for cooking  :rolleyes: 

You might want to print off a copy of the sneaky sugars list & the additives list for going forward.....

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Thanks for your reply. I used a tiny bit in the end.The EB does give off a funny smell, and I'll be buying some without it ASAP. Thanks also for the sugars list. I have managed to avoid all of these successfully so far! 

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Making ghee is easy! And so good if you start with grass-fed, pastured butter. Only thing to watch out for is covering the pot as it goes. In my experience, butter while clarifying can "splorp" all over the stove — hot and messy!

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On 2/26/2016 at 2:42 AM, TonyG123 said:

Hi,

 

this is my first time posting. I'm on Day 20 and it's going amazingly well. I'm actually finding it pretty easy aside from the occasional extra piece of fruit here and there. My question is regarding Ethyl Butyrate in ghee. It seems to be prevalent in a lot of versions here in the UK. It's only 0.01% of the content so very minimal, but is it compliant? 

 

I have a tub at home waiting to be cracked open if it is!

 

 

Old post, but for those here from google...

Butyric acid is found naturally in dairy. Ethyl butyrate is an ester of the acid. Would that not be a naturally occurring ingredient and not an additive? I know it's beneficial for digestion and butter is a natural place to get it in your diet...

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Naturally occurring compounds are not listed separately in the ingredients list. It's easiest to see using balsamic vinegars as an example. 

Vinegar A:

Ingredients: Grape must, red wine vinegar. 

Contains Sulfites

Vinegar B:

Ingredients: Burgundy wine vinegar diluted with water to 5% acidity, sulfur dioxide. 

Contains Sulfites

See how the second one has sulfur dioxide listed in the ingredients while the first one simply has a warning that the product contains sulfites? That means it's naturally occurring in Vinegar A but added in Vinegar B. 

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Alright that clears up some confusion for me, thanks for that example. So confusing trying to make sense of a food label...

Even more confusing to me is why a food company has to add an ingredient to a food that should already contain it naturally. Cause yeah there is a huge difference in butyric acid occurring naturally in milk and the ethyl butyrate they produce from starch, which could be wheat starch or who knows???

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