Hiking


Mhanson6

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Hello,

I love to hike and i have just started the whole 30 plan. I normal take a PB & J along with a good trail mix and an apple to eat at the top of the mountain or trail, before I head back down. I am planning a hike this weekend. And I am kind of stuck on what to take in my pack. I will still take my apple, and my trail mix (usually just cashews, almonds and dried fruit, (sometimes other stuff but leaving those out). Any suggestions? 

Thanks!

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Hardboiled eggs, tinned fish, meatballs, sweet potato, grilled chicken... 

You'll be much better off taking real food than dried fruit and nuts... I'd still bring the apple but I'd take some proper food... not sure how intense your hikes are but if they're pretty decent, you'd be better off treating the top of the trail snack as a post workout meal which is lean protein and starchy carbs... 

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Quality jerkys are always good with water.  Where I hike, I would be ringing the dinner bell with aromas of many foods.  Canned fish/tightly wrapped jerky is good but there's that fish can you have to carry back on your person.  So that's something to consider in bear-mountain backcountry. 

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Quality jerkys are always good with water.  Where I hike, I would be ringing the dinner bell with aromas of many foods.  Canned fish/tightly wrapped jerky is good but there's that fish can you have to carry back on your person.  So that's something to consider in bear-mountain backcountry. 

Oooh, good point... I did think of that when I suggested the tinned fish... I'm not much of an outdoorsperson... 

I suppose anything you can reasonably put in a ziploc would work...olives, chicken, jerky, avocado etc... wouldn't want the hiker to become someone else's lunch!

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Smoky Mountains, Rocky Mountains...anywhere there's bears,  springtime is the most crucial time of the year when bears are hungry/coming out of hibernation.   A silvertip grizzly can smell you from 18 miles away.  A bear's sense of smell is 100X greater than a human's. 

 

Ziplock bags, coolers, even trunks of a car, standard garbage cans (not bearproof),backpacks....grizzlies can rip the lids off of metal cans.

 

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I am in bear country I live in Knoxville Tn and hike in the Smokes, But In all the times I've been hiking I've only come across 1 bear,I wear bear bells on my pack and that seems (at least I think) to make enough noise to keep the away. Ill consider the jerky, avocado, chicken and the eggs. Those would all be light weight and easily portable. Tuna might be to hard to carry/open and transport plus have a strong smell. Thanks!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Mhanson6, I do hard boiled eggs, carrots, apple, and a small baggie of nuts for my day hikes (in southern WI here).  I pack a Larabar for emergencies (if my hike is really intense and I eat through all my food, although I never get to it).  I've even thrown a small little blue cooler pack in my day bag just to keep things cooler since I'm not a fan of lukewarm eggs... 

I still don't want to spring for the cost of compliant jerky, but I will have to when I go backpacking this coming fall lol.

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Salted cooked eggs from Asian markets are stable at room temp. I take them camping. They are vacuum sealed, usually in red wrap. As a bonus they are salty! The texture is different from a hard boiled egg, not rubbery. And sooooo yummy!

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For a longer hiking trip, Paleo Meals to Go has some good options for dehydrated food that are just meat and veggies (make sure you pack fat and salt to add, though--like a pot of coconut oil or ghee or packets of olive oil or something.)

 

For a day-hike I would pack anything I normally eat. Seriously. A kale salad will do fine in a container all day, maybe not tuna salad without an ice pack, but pretty much anything else.

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Salted cooked eggs from Asian markets are stable at room temp. I take them camping. They are vacuum sealed, usually in red wrap. As a bonus they are salty! The texture is different from a hard boiled egg, not rubbery. And sooooo yummy!

 

 

Dear god NO!! sick-puking-smiley-emoticon.gif

 

Holy crap, I thought I'd made a post about this.  I picked up a sixer of these at a local Korean grocery store ... thinking, "Hey, cool, precooked eggs, awesome!"

 

VAvkPnY.jpg?1

 

OMG...............bareelllllyy choked one down, thought to myself, "well, maybe that was just a bad one" ... ate another one in the same sitting ... *koff* NOPE it wasn't a fluke: these eggs and I do not get along :)

 

 

 

But seriously folks, if these work for you, awesome!! If you've seen my posts around this forum, you know I'm definitely not a picky eater.  I realllly wanted to like these eggs, but I just couldn't make it work for me.

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HAHAHAHA where'd you get the vomiting emoticon?! LOVE IT! But I love century eggs too, so maybe I'm just messed up and not a good one to ask  :P

 

Yes, they are different than a HB egg. I make my own salted eggs too. Less texture change, more like HB. 

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  • 1 month later...

For a longer hiking trip, Paleo Meals to Go has some good options for dehydrated food that are just meat and veggies (make sure you pack fat and salt to add, though--like a pot of coconut oil or ghee or packets of olive oil or something.)

 

For a day-hike I would pack anything I normally eat. Seriously. A kale salad will do fine in a container all day, maybe not tuna salad without an ice pack, but pretty much anything else.

Be careful with some of those meals!  Most of the meals, except for the "Summit Savory Chicken" and the "Mountain Beef Stew" have coconut sugar in them.  Otherwise, in a pinch I can see purchasing these.  It'd still be A LOT cheaper to make your own if you have the time/resources.  $12.99 per meal is crazy!  I think the backpacking meals I used to get had two servings per bag. These only have one  :(

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  • 10 months later...

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