MistyDFisher

Intermittent Fasting?

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That sounds exactly like a hormonal issue to me... and one that MANY people have... we definitely don't want you vomitting tho... some things that are easier to get down in the morning while this is resolving are potato, sweet potato, soups (www.meljoulwan.com has lots of amazing ones like silky gingered zucchini soup).

Plate up your template meal, eat as much as you can, even if it's only two or three small bites, and then take it with you and eat from it again as soon as you are able... don't wait to be hungry... two or three bites here and there... do this every day... it should resolve in less than a week.

 

You're posting in the intermittent fasting thread and it's almost assuredly going to come up that you could intermittent fast in order to get around this problem and that is absolutely not recommended.  If, once your hormones are in check and you have eaten three template meals a day (4-5 hours apart) for a decent amount of time, you choose to try IF, then that's okay... but using it to prevent having to deal with the problem is not recommended.  

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I am currently doing Keto with IF and have been for about 9 months but not seeing the results I was looking for. Is it safe to transition to Whole30 after doing IF for that long and also Keto or am I going to pack on pounds? Or would it be better to continue doing IF since I already have been for so long? I don't plan on adding in a ton of starchy carbs but plan on upping my carbs slightly more than I am currently doing. I have Hashimotos, PCOS and Estrogen dominance for reference.  Any help would be greatly appreciated!!

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Following the Whole30 recommended guidelines of breakfast within 1 hour of waking combined with 3 meals a day + no snacking may mean your feeding window is larger than it was during IF (depending on what protocol you've been following).  The meal scheduling part of Whole30 is recommended, not a rule, and while IF is not recommended for beginners to the Whole30, the fact that you are already adapted may mean it makes more sense to continue with your IF schedule.

You use the phrase "pack on pounds" and mention that IF+keto haven't been giving you results.  Were you hoping to get weight loss results from IF+keto?  While many people do lose weight employing one or both of those strategies, neither are in-and-of-themselves about weight loss (just like Whole30). Neither IF nor keto are implicitly calorie-restricted, so you won't necessarily be adding calories without realizing if you do a Whole30.  IF tells you *when* to eat, keto & Whole30 rules tell you
*what* to eat, and Whole30 meal template guidelines tell you *how much* to eat. So yes, it's possible that a by-the-book Whole30 may lead to greater weight loss than IF and/or keto, but the Whole30 is not designed to be a weight loss program.  You are not meant to be hungry during the 30 days + reintro days.

With your keto experience, you may have a head start from having reduced processed sugary foods and beverages.  But depending on how much of your food was comprised of dairy, almond flour concoctions, and artificial sweeteners, you might find a Whole30 transition rocky.

See some of the links in my signature for my keto-related Whole30 experiences.

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Just want to add my observations in case anyone else has experienced this...

I've done several Whole30s (six? seven?) over the past five years and I've noticed that in the evening I get into a rhythm of not eating for about 12 hours over night.  So, I might finish dinner by 8:00pm, then wake up just before 8:00am the next day and then have breakfast.  I've noticed that when I do this I have more stable energy and that my body seems to heal faster.  Is this an example of intermittant fasting?

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4 hours ago, kirkor said:

Following the Whole30 recommended guidelines of breakfast within 1 hour of waking combined with 3 meals a day + no snacking may mean your feeding window is larger than it was during IF (depending on what protocol you've been following).  The meal scheduling part of Whole30 is recommended, not a rule, and while IF is not recommended for beginners to the Whole30, the fact that you are already adapted may mean it makes more sense to continue with your IF schedule.

You use the phrase "pack on pounds" and mention that IF+keto haven't been giving you results.  Were you hoping to get weight loss results from IF+keto?  While many people do lose weight employing one or both of those strategies, neither are in-and-of-themselves about weight loss (just like Whole30). Neither IF nor keto are implicitly calorie-restricted, so you won't necessarily be adding calories without realizing if you do a Whole30.  IF tells you *when* to eat, keto & Whole30 rules tell you
*what* to eat, and Whole30 meal template guidelines tell you *how much* to eat. So yes, it's possible that a by-the-book Whole30 may lead to greater weight loss than IF and/or keto, but the Whole30 is not designed to be a weight loss program.  You are not meant to be hungry during the 30 days + reintro days.

With your keto experience, you may have a head start from having reduced processed sugary foods and beverages.  But depending on how much of your food was comprised of dairy, almond flour concoctions, and artificial sweeteners, you might find a Whole30 transition rocky.

See some of the links in my signature for my keto-related Whole30 experiences.

I have been IF daily since June 2016 as well as doing keto to help release weight gained after being on hormone replacement. I have lost maybe 10 lbs in that 9 months. I just started experimenting with carb ups and then decided maybe whole30 would be a better balance for me. My keto diet was relatively calorie restricted 1200-1600 calories a day and very clean, no dairy. I have been eating dairy occasionally over the past month but that's all. Only using stevia as sweetener. I just don't want to gain back what I've already lost.

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1 hour ago, Mrs.P2014 said:

I have been IF daily since June 2016 as well as doing keto to help release weight gained after being on hormone replacement. I have lost maybe 10 lbs in that 9 months. I just started experimenting with carb ups and then decided maybe whole30 would be a better balance for me. My keto diet was relatively calorie restricted 1200-1600 calories a day and very clean, no dairy. I have been eating dairy occasionally over the past month but that's all. Only using stevia as sweetener. I just don't want to gain back what I've already lost.

With your Hashimotos, PCOS & Eostrogen dominance and your history of restricted calorie intake I'll be honest and say I'd imagine you'll see weight gain during your 30 days, although anecdotal evidence would suggest that that would settle & switch the other way if you chose to extend, allowing your hormones to realign & your body to heal, and also chose to follow not just the rules but the recommendations.

Whole30 is NOT a diet. The aim is NOT to lose weight. Whole30 is a 30 day gut reset/elimination protocol designed in way that at the end of the 30 days you can reintroduce the eliminated foods and see which will & won't work for your optimal health going forward. Some people (but absolutely not all) see weightloss as a side effect. For YOUR optimal health you want hormonal balance. In terms of Whole30, eating within an hour of wakening is key to that, as is eating the three template meals, 4-5 hrs apart.

I'm not medically trained, but I would have thought that the stress alone of restricting calories in the way that you are would be enough to keep your leptin, cortisol & ghrelin hormones askew in a way that would slow down the metabolism long term, which is the opposite of what you want with Hashimotos for starters.

How is your sleep?

Are you seeing a Functional Medicine Doctor or Holistic Nutritionist?

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With a thyroid gland being progressively eaten up by the body’s immune system, hypothyroidism, a slow metabolism that goes along with that state....

Chronic low carb or zero carb calorie eating–chronic carb/calorie counting and trying to keep carb/calories low–is also a way to give yourself low thyroid levels.  Nothing will make the thyroid levels drop faster than chronic overrestriction for the progressive destruction of the thyroid gland.

Start training your body to function on a higher baseline level of calories, replacing cardio with more efficient and less harmful types of exercise, and maximizing cellular energy production/speeding up your metabolism through a super nutrient dense whole foods that provides your cells with all the macronutrients.

For people who have already trained themselves into metabolic dysfunction from chronic calorie/carb restriction and overexercising, it's the way to preserve your thyroid from progressive destruction.

So anyone burning and taking in about 2,000 calories a day, now, after many years of chronically trying to take in less calories and do more exercise (just as everyone in the fat loss industry tells you to do), you find yourself with a slow metabolism, and a body that takes in and burns only 1,400 or 1,500 calories per day.

Participants on a major weight loss show were found to have slower metabolic rates after the show is over—the study found they were burning over 500 calories less per day than when they were obese.

The study said that over 90% of the participants gained back all the weight they lost during the show with metabolic slowdown. 

If you start off burning and taking in about 2,000 calories each day, then all the sudden—from all the dieting and exercise you’re doing—your metabolism slows down so you’re only burning 1,500 calories each day.. why so many people continually spin their wheels in a cycle of losing and regaining the same 10, 20, or 30 pounds, year after year.

And it’s why many find themselves in a situation where they’re doing tons of exercise, and eating clean, yet still failing to see fat loss. When you train your body through chronic calorie/carb restriction, you may lose fat initially, but then your body becomes resistant to further fat loss–even while eating hardly anything and doing tons of exercise...especially for the hashi thyroid.

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7 hours ago, jmcbn said:

With your Hashimotos, PCOS & Eostrogen dominance and your history of restricted calorie intake I'll be honest and say I'd imagine you'll see weight gain during your 30 days, although anecdotal evidence would suggest that that would settle & switch the other way if you chose to extend, allowing your hormones to realign & your body to heal, and also chose to follow not just the rules but the recommendations.

Whole30 is NOT a diet. The aim is NOT to lose weight. Whole30 is a 30 day gut reset/elimination protocol designed in way that at the end of the 30 days you can reintroduce the eliminated foods and see which will & won't work for your optimal health going forward. Some people (but absolutely not all) see weightloss as a side effect. For YOUR optimal health you want hormonal balance. In terms of Whole30, eating within an hour of wakening is key to that, as is eating the three template meals, 4-5 hrs apart.

I'm not medically trained, but I would have thought that the stress alone of restricting calories in the way that you are would be enough to keep your leptin, cortisol & ghrelin hormones askew in a way that would slow down the metabolism long term, which is the opposite of what you want with Hashimotos for starters.

How is your sleep?

Are you seeing a Functional Medicine Doctor or Holistic Nutritionist?

I plan on keeping it relatively low carb but will obviously be eating less fat than I currently am so I don't really see why I would see weight gain. I have been trying to increase my carbs through carb ups a few time a week but was doing it with  crappy food(french fries, candy, cheese and ice cream) but it lasted a few weeks and I realized it was getting out of control and I have been paleo for nearly 4 years. Thats why I chose to do a whole30 to find a happy balance between what I was doing and a more well rounded diet and introduce carbs in a healthy way to support my thyroid and PCOS.   I do see a Functional medicine Dr. I have always had good sleep, that has never been an issue. 

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4 hours ago, MeadowLily said:

With a thyroid gland being progressively eaten up by the body’s immune system, hypothyroidism, a slow metabolism that goes along with that state....

Chronic low carb or zero carb calorie eating–chronic carb/calorie counting and trying to keep carb/calories low–is also a way to give yourself low thyroid levels.  Nothing will make the thyroid levels drop faster than chronic overrestriction for the progressive destruction of the thyroid gland.

Start training your body to function on a higher baseline level of calories, replacing cardio with more efficient and less harmful types of exercise, and maximizing cellular energy production/speeding up your metabolism through a super nutrient dense whole foods that provides your cells with all the macronutrients.

For people who have already trained themselves into metabolic dysfunction from chronic calorie/carb restriction and overexercising, it's the way to preserve your thyroid from progressive destruction.

So anyone burning and taking in about 2,000 calories a day, now, after many years of chronically trying to take in less calories and do more exercise (just as everyone in the fat loss industry tells you to do), you find yourself with a slow metabolism, and a body that takes in and burns only 1,400 or 1,500 calories per day.

Participants on a major weight loss show were found to have slower metabolic rates after the show is over—the study found they were burning over 500 calories less per day than when they were obese.

The study said that over 90% of the participants gained back all the weight they lost during the show with metabolic slowdown. 

If you start off burning and taking in about 2,000 calories each day, then all the sudden—from all the dieting and exercise you’re doing—your metabolism slows down so you’re only burning 1,500 calories each day.. why so many people continually spin their wheels in a cycle of losing and regaining the same 10, 20, or 30 pounds, year after year.

And it’s why many find themselves in a situation where they’re doing tons of exercise, and eating clean, yet still failing to see fat loss. When you train your body through chronic calorie/carb restriction, you may lose fat initially, but then your body becomes resistant to further fat loss–even while eating hardly anything and doing tons of exercise...especially for the hashi thyroid.

I walk about 20k steps on avg per day and also do Pilates so I do not over exercise and never have been one to, due to my thyroid/adrenals/CEBV it has always been hard for me to find energy to exercise in excessive amounts.

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15 minutes ago, Mrs.P2014 said:

I plan on keeping it relatively low carb but will obviously be eating less fat than I currently am so I don't really see why I would see weight gain

Because if you do your Whole30 as written we would be asking you to NOT restrict calories, but rather to listen to your body & fuel it as needed. That is going to be more calories than you have been consuming in recent months and often, following a period of restriction, the body then holds on to what fuel it is given & stores it rather than burning it, in case a 'famine' is on the cards again any time soon. Once the body learns that the fuel is plentiful and allows itself to heal, then it releases what it no longer needs. That normally takes longer than 30 days.

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10 minutes ago, jmcbn said:

Because if you do your Whole30 as written we would be asking you to NOT restrict calories, but rather to listen to your body & fuel it as needed. That is going to be more calories than you have been consuming in recent months and often, following a period of restriction, the body then holds on to what fuel it is given & stores it rather than burning it, in case a 'famine' is on the cards again any time soon. Once the body learns that the fuel is plentiful and allows itself to heal, then it releases what it no longer needs. That normally takes longer than 30 days.

Got it! Thank you! 

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