Not Quite Getting Fats


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I'm struggling with adding fats to my meals.

 

This is not because I'm subconsciously trying to avoid fats. I think it's because I'm a stuck up cook. :o I'm finding it really hard to add fat just for the sake of adding fat when it doesn't make sense with the meal. (And I'm avoiding eggs in order to test for a sensitivity after 30 days, so homemade mayo is out. I tried the coconut butter version and it just did not work for me as a mayo substitute.)

 

First, it seems to me that using a normal amount of cooking fat to cook for the family, when divided into portions, is probably not going to cover my fat requirement? Just looking for a reality check here.

 

Second, I really don't want everything I make to taste like coconut. I'm coming at this hoping to make some sustainable changes, and an all coconut diet isn't sustainable for me! I have been eating unsweetened coconut shreds, but that could get to be an expensive habit. I love olives and avocado, just not at every meal and I'm loving them less after just a week of eating them so frequently.

 

OK, that was more of a rant than a question. I guess the question is, do people really drink canned coconut milk???

 

Third, I'm confused about nuts. Nuts and nut butter are included on the meal template, but I know they don't have an ideal ratio of fats. So how many nut servings a day is reasonable?

 

I think I've been doing OK with my fat portions so far, but I'm struggling to make this a more natural part of meal planning.

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A closed handful of nuts/seeds every other day is about as much as we'd recommend.

You could try making egg free mayo with avocado oil (option 2 or 3 here) - it's a bit of a faff, but it is something other than oil to put on a salad or roasted veg. then there's also ghee, tallow, lard, schmaltz, duck fat, goose fat, compliant bacon, fatty cuts of meat like shin/brisket, chicken thighs with skins on...

The oil you're using to cook really isn't enough.

 

Re the coconut you can buy refined coconut which has the flavour removed.

Hope this helps  :)

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You could try making egg free mayo with avocado oil (option 2 or 3 here) - it's a bit of a faff, but it is something other than oil to put on a salad or roasted veg. then there's also ghee, tallow, lard, schmaltz, duck fat, goose fat, compliant bacon, fatty cuts of meat like shin/brisket, chicken thighs with skins on...

 

Thanks jmcbn. I am definitely going to try option 3.

 

As for the other fats (other than compliant bacon), I'd be curious how everyone is using them. What do you do with your extra ghee, tallow, lard, duck fat, etc? And I thought the fatty cuts of meat didn't count as the "fat" portion of the meal template?

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I'm with you. Many of my meals just don't seem easy to plop on a glob of fat. I don't like avocados and olives since starting the diet (...no idea why my tastes have changed!) and can't stand everything to taste like coconut. There are VERY few things that I have found coconut oil to be acceptable with. So my options are mainly ghee, olive oil and mayo.

 

I'll put ghee on some vegetables (cooked spinach, broccoli, etc) but sometimes I don't want veggies swimming in fat!

 

The easiest way for me to get in fats when I don't want my meal tampered with, is to add a small side salad with a nice oil and vinegar dressing (homemade) or mayo-based dressing (ranch, etc). I use just enough salad to hold the 1 tbsp of fat I need in a meal. It hardly counts towards my veggie total, so I don't even consider it as such. In other words, I have 1-3 cups of veggies and the salad greens are just part of the fat.

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If the ghee is not palatable to you try different compliant oils, some of them have a very light taste.  I like walnut oil, avocado or light tasting olive oil, you can use these to put on cooked vegetables or meat instead of the ghee as well.  You might also want to try different types of coconut milk, some taste stronger than others and I usually only add coconut milk to soups or curries, I don't add them anywhere else where they don't really belong.

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I have an obsession with 2 fats:

 

Mayo and Duck fat.

I roast my veggies in duck fat.  Although they are pretty awesome with ghee too - but being extremely dairy sensitive - I have a tendency to stay away from ghee, although it is pretty awesome too.

 

Mayo - I just put that sh*t on everything.  :P

 

Avocados and I just don't get along and coconut products (outside of refined coconut oil) give me tummy and digestive issues.

 

Olives are usually saved for my cheese cravings - Need something salty, briny and creamy in texture - they fit the bill.  Bacon will also work as well.

 

I find Coconut milk works really good in recipes - coconut milk is a great flavour carrier for strong robust flavours like curries.  

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Thanks jmcbn. I am definitely going to try option 3.

 

As for the other fats (other than compliant bacon), I'd be curious how everyone is using them. What do you do with your extra ghee, tallow, lard, duck fat, etc? And I thought the fatty cuts of meat didn't count as the "fat" portion of the meal template?

Option 3 doesn't yield a great amount - I'd suggest doubling up, and don't be too disappointed if it doesn't form peaks.... It will however solidify in the fridge, and then whip up nicely  :) 

Re the fatty cuts of meat, on their own they're not really sufficient, but add a serving of veg roasted in ghee/lard/goose fat (& a coffee with coconut milk if you fancy it) and you're good to go  B)

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LadyD - not sure where you are located - but you might have some luck finding duck fat via online - Fatworks.  

Duck fat is regularly available here in grocery stores here (Eastern Canada - predominately Quebec) although I am pretty sure these animals are not pasture raised.

 

Amazon might have some as well - I know pastured Duck Fat can be a bit spendy - but it IS delicious.

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Coconut is traditional in Thai curries and in a few kinds of Indian curries, I find the other flavours really cut through the coconut. Some brands vary a lot in coconut flavor, I've found one kind of oil I just can't use with meat, it tastes sweet and makes the meat taste weird. Shop around, try a few brands.

 

I also really like coconut cream in coffee :) in general I prefer coconut with strong flavours.

 

Duck fat and goose fat are great on potatoes and root veggies (ghee is too). Rather than steam greens, you can give them a light pan fry with some duck fat or ghee. I love asparagus pan fried in duck fat until it gets just a hint of crispy brown.

 

In Australia we get duck fat at the supermarket now (yay!) but it's also available (with goose fat) at European delis/grocers.

 

Some recipes are naturally fattier than others, chicken wings have a higher fat-to-meat ratio than say chicken breast.

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I wanted to follow-up and say that I've been playing around with these ideas since I started this thread, and the best solution for me appears to be adding a little fat to everything instead of thinking of a "fat portion" of the meal. (Hope that makes sense.) I add a small side salad, as madness suggested, if I think the meal overall is low in fat. It's all adding up to more fat than I was getting before.

 

I also tried the famous coffee and coconut cream. I actually prefer my coffee black, BUT I think I will *love* cold pressed coffee with coconut cream for summer. Time to experiment...

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I also tried the famous coffee and coconut cream. I actually prefer my coffee black, BUT I think I will *love* cold pressed coffee with coconut cream for summer. Time to experiment...

As an iced coffee drinker, I feel like I should warn you -- be sure you blend your cold coffee and coconut cream in a blender or with an immersion blender or you'll get kind of chunky bits of coconut cream. It's still fine to drink if it does that, but it doesn't look very appealing.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I've had the same questions about the fat portion of the meal. I'm almost 30 days in, but I've always felt like some of my meals were lacking the appropriate amounts of fat. I definitely cook with it - olive oil and ghee, mostly. I used olive oil and a little balsamic vinegar on salads. Sometimes I add ghee or olive oil post cooking to the veggies on my plate, but I question whether or not I've gotten enough good fats overall. I also question the serving size. What does thumb size translate to in tablespoons or other measurements?

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I also question the serving size. What does thumb size translate to in tablespoons or other measurements?

Personally I always say 'a generous serving of' because that way people are less likely to short change themselves, and believe me people feel a whole lot better when they eat enough.

 

I can't eat avocado's but when I could I ate a half, I drizzle oil freely, I use maybe 3 heaped teaspoons of mayo, an open handful of olives.... Really, it's a lot more common for people to under eat fat rather than over eat it - don't fear the fat!!

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Thanks and LOVE the quick response. I should have been on the forum long time ago, but I don't plan to stop at 30 days. Not sure if I've lost any weight, but I definitely see the NSVs. My waist is shrinking, slowly but surely, and my blood pressure has gone down significantly. I still sometimes have a yucky feeling, sour stomach when I wake up in the mornings. Not every morning, but some. Still trying to figure out what that can be. What does the "good fat" help with?

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What does the "good fat" help with?

The brain is made up of 60% fat so you need good fats for brain health for starters. It's also required for absorbing fat soluble vitamins, and can be used as a source of energy. Fats also provide satiety, help keep blood sugars stable, contain essential nutrients, help in the production of hormones and support cell growth, as well as providing insulation amongst other things....

 

Not forgetting of course that fat provides flavour!!

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