loser_bride

Heart Rate During Whole 30

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I am currently on day 16 of my Whole 30 journey and following the program as exact as possible, poor fiance hates that I spend more time reading labels anymore.. 

 

I know there is a curve from going from sugar energy to fat adapted and I'm slowly getting my runs longer and faster, however I'm experiencing something new... My resting heart rate has dropped since starting Whole 30 from 65/67 to 59/60 but my running heart rate has jumped through the roof.  

 

Example: Resting heart rate today as 59, but my 4 mile run of a 9:35, 9:24, 9:14 and lastly 8:44 had my heart rate well above 155-172 at it's highest. 

 

Has anyone else experienced this before? I have done about 20 half marathons and am not new to running in any respect.  The above times are significantly slower than I was running pre-Whole 30 but the heart rate has gotten higher.  Really trying to get a grasp on this whole thing. 

 

Thanks so much for any and all advice!! I feel like I'm some anomaly at the moment.  

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I'm having this same issue and just came to the forums to ask.  Hopefully someone can chime in.  

 

I'm trying to keep mine in aerobic or threshold for my long runs, but this morning's LR had me struggling to keep it below max.  I was not running hard at all, but I couldn't get the number down unless I took walk breaks, and then it would jump back up again within 30 seconds of resuming running (at a snail's pace, because I am still in the middle of the "running uphill in the mud" phase)

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As you know, higher heart rate can result from many factors. Not getting enough sleep, illness, heat/humidity, exertion, stressful work/family/relationship... Right now, your body is completely changing from sugar-burner to fat-burner, and this is a significant process! Give it some time and take it easy in the meantime to allow the adaptation to take place. Do hikes instead of runs, go shorter and easier than your usual workouts ... and make sure you're drinking plenty of water, too.

 

This too shall pass.

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Today I did a long run and managed to keep my HR within "threshold" range for almost the entire run.  It would increase on hills, so I walked most of them.  Still not as low as I'd like it to be, but this is a definite improvement.  Hooray!  

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I can't speak to the question of heart rate while exercising, but I can speak to the resting heart rate part.  I am post-Whole30 at this point, having done three of them over the last couple of years.  I eat a Whole30-ish diet though, and track what I eat carefully.  

 

My resting heart rate is noticeably affected by two food categories.  The first is "holiday" eating.  I'm not entirely sure what the underlying sources of the change are.  I first noticed this over Christmas last year, when I had cookies, cake, candy, caramel corn, wine and beer, pizza, and even some (very aged) cheese.  The night with wine, pizza, and caramel corn was the worst.  My resting heart rate jumped from around 60 to almost 70 and I felt really awful for a few days until it all cleared my system.  I have tested it in milder ways at other special occasions, and have noticed a similar jump, albeit smaller because I have indulged in fewer of the potentially problematic foods.  It could be sheer quantity of calories my body has to process, as well as types of foods or types of macronutrients.  

 

The second category is smaller, but with a distinct positive result.  When I eat a packet of salmon every day for a week, after not having any for a month or so, my resting heart rate commonly drops by about 5 beats per minute.  I figure this is a result of the Omega-3s in the fish.  I try to take advantage of it by eating salmon 2-3 times per week.

 

My resting heart rate also increases when I am sick or when I am lacking sleep, and decreases when I'm healthy and well rested.  

 

ThyPeace,  And, of course, as I get more physically fit, the long-term resting heart rate trend is down.  My resting heart rate last night was 55 BPM.  A year ago, it was 65 BPM.

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The second category is smaller, but with a distinct positive result.  When I eat a packet of salmon every day for a week, after not having any for a month or so, my resting heart rate commonly drops by about 5 beats per minute.  I figure this is a result of the Omega-3s in the fish.  I try to take advantage of it by eating salmon 2-3 times per week.

Absolutely this.

I'm forever singing the praises of oily fish on these forums - not sure how many folk pay attention though! I eat either salmon or mackerel pretty much every day - it has amazing benefits for heart health, bone health, and for brain health, and when eaten alongside starches in particular it's a natural antidepressant.

Fish for the win!!  :D

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So I'm a physician on day 20 of my first Whole30. I exercise vigorously about four hours a week and am not a runner or endurance athlete. I haven't changed my exercise patterns at all in the last three weeks (ok, maybe a few gym drop ins more than usual because I'm feeling good). My resting heart rate has dropped from a respectable mid-60s to low 50s and I have no good explanation for it. 

Glad to at least see this is "a thing". 

 

image.jpeg

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Definitely a "thing," and my heart rate pattern looked very similar when I shifted out of a high-treat mode and into a high-whole-foods mode.  My resting heart rate only jumps these days if I am sick, particularly if part of being sick is coughing or something else that interferes with sleep.  I am also reading a book about bodybuilding at the moment (because hey, what else do I have to do besides read books about random kinds of fitness?) and in it, the author describes the reasons for the "whoosh" effect, as it is known in bodybuilding.  That's what occurs when you've been dieting for some time, but the scale hasn't changed any.  Then all of a sudden you switch something -- get a really long night's sleep (this always works for me), eat more on a given day, relax a whole bunch, or something like that.  Suddenly there are quite a few trips to the bathroom to let go of water weight, and voila, you've lost a few pounds.  The theory is that dieting increases cortisol levels, which increases fluid retention.  All of the above actions are ones that can down-shift cortisol, so the body lets go of the water.  I never knew why that happened; it's nice to at least have confirmation that it does and an explanation of why.

 

ThyPeace, and this is why I read random books about things; to piece together what's going on in my world.

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Theory1,  if you're eating something you are not tolerating well it raises your HR. Cutting it out on the W30 gives the body chance to stop reacting to it.

Theory 2, use HR during the reintroduction phase to understand what foods you react to.

So can we test this out?

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2 hours ago, Puckertoe said:

So can we test this out

Your reintroduction is a self experiment, so if you think you can detect changes in heart rate and accurately assume they've been caused by food then I don;t see why not. I wouldn't rely on this alone though.

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  Ever since I reached my weight goal in August, I have been playing with foods more than I had been.  Every time I have foods like cupcakes, my heart rate will jump a bit for a few days.  If I have a lot of stuff like that -- my birthday burrito with a white tortilla, rice, various other things, and corn chips on the side, for example, it'll jump more.  It comes back down in a couple of days, presumably after my body has processed whatever it is that causes the effect.  It has become an excellent motivation to limit those foods, in fact.

 

ThyPeace, makes "worth it" a far more immediate consideration.

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I see that this is an old thread but I thought I’d post a screenshot of my heart rate anyway. It has dropped quite a bit since I’ve started as well, which is how I ended up on this thread. I actually take the beta-blocker Metoprolol for a bit of a jumpy heart, and I almost feel like I may need to stop taking it now. 

BBFB3545-DAC6-4034-9759-85C6AD435E13.jpeg

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Glad to see this is a thing ... I just searched on here to see if others were having the same effect on their resting heart rate and such similar experiences! I'm amazed that I've dropped from 74 RHR on 1/2 after the holidays to an all-time low 49 in less than 3 weeks.

image.thumb.png.fa29bab18a156d1b26ca4a98913ebf89.png

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I too have a lower resting heart rate on Whole 30. The cardiologist noticed my resting heart rate was 67, when it's normally in the high 80s. My heart rate doesn't get as high during high intensity cardio workouts either. I'm curious as to why but am happy to be reaping the benefits of better health from Whole 30.

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