Bones for Bone Broth


Haysmith91

Recommended Posts

I'd some tips about where to buy just bones for bone broth, preferably chicken. I've done research online but I can't really find a clear answer.

Also, any advice on making bone broth? I make a whole roast chicken and then make broth from those bones, but I'm still new to the game and I struggle with technique. I know that it takes practice, but I'd appreciate any tips on the process.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I usually do chicken bones, but save up one carcass in the freezer till we have another one, then do two chickens worth.

I usually just add some veg, and peppercorns to the carcass, cover in water in the pressure cooker, heat till it starts to whistle then turn it way down so it's just keeping pressure, and then leave for 'several hours'.

 

I did ask at the local butcher about bones for broth/stock, and they asked what animal I wanted, and were about to go and get some from out the back, but I wasn't ready for them, was just enquiring.  I still have tubs of chicken stock in the freezer, as we don't use it quick enough.

 

If you want high welfare, organic, grass fed, etc, then just ask the butcher.  they should be able to source this for you.  much better than a supermarket.

 

not sure what you'll do if you don't have a local butcher...

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Moderators

Another question - if I use the bones from a 4 lb chicken, is that enough? Or should I save them and wait for more?

 

You can use just those, you will either get not as much broth (if you just cover the bones/vegetables with water), or you'll have weaker broth (if you go ahead and fill the pot with water even though there are fewer bones).

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Moderators

How much broth is too much?  I've been warming up a mug of bone broth with my breakfast and I really enjoy the flavor and the strange comforting sensation I get from it.  I never drink it more than once a day, but out of curiosity, how much is too much?

 

I've never seen a guideline. A mug or two a day is probably okay. I guess I'd be worried if you are consistently drinking broth instead of water, or if it is keeping you from eating your meals.

 

There is some protein in broth, I'm not sure how much, generally not enough to have it count as a serving of protein for a meal, but I guess if you had a medical condition requiring you to limit protein, you'd need to pay more attention.

Link to post
Share on other sites

For chicken bone broth, I prefer cooked bones, so I keep the bones from my roasted chicken wings and roast chickens in the freezer until I have enough for a batch of bone broth :)

one thing to note is that if you're making broth from bones from a butcher they do need to be roasted first, this brings out flavour, and there possibly another reason too, can't remember, something about getting more goodness out, or something, but yeah, if you just buy beef bones, then roast on the hottest setting for a half hour first before making the broth.  If you're using bones from a joint you've already cooked then obviously you don't need to roast them again.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Administrators

one thing to note is that if you're making broth from bones from a butcher they do need to be roasted first

You don't have to do this, it's just personal preference. It's the acid (ACV) that will leach the minerals out of the bones. If you roast bones first you may get a "browner" broth quicker and some people prefer the flavour.  I've never pre-roasted any of my bones and my broth comes out just fine.  :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...
  • Moderators
1 hour ago, Goodvibetribe said:

Do any of you make yours in a crockpot?

I have. There are instructions online, just Google crockpot bone broth. It's easier for me -- I turn it on and mostly ignore it. Check every now and then and make sure your water isn't evaporating, just top it off if it is.

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Goodvibetribe said:

Do any of you make yours in a crockpot?

I make all my bone broth in the slow cooker. Cover bones with water, add some roughly chopped carrot and onion if you wish, about 10 peppercorns, a few herb sprigs, turn on to low then basically forget about it. I simmer beef broth for 24 hours and chicken about 10 hrs.

I've a question: Has anyone used chicken feet for broth? I bought some with my on-line meat order as they are very cheap and contain a lot of collagen, but not sure how many to use with one chicken carcass.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've made bone broth with beef bones I got at my supermarket, asked the meat cutter behind the meat counter,  I bought 2 good sized bones with lots of marrow in them and a neck bone, and short ribs so I'd have some meat.  Put them in the crock pot and covered them with filtered water, added some sea salt, and pepper corns, and of course some applecider vinegar, turned my crock pot to the low setting and put it on the maximum time (20 hours) and left it alone that was my first time making it and it turned out AWESOME, used the meat from the bones to make vegetable beef soup and only used carrots, onions, and celery to flavor, all I have to say is YUMMMMM!  Good luck!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I've roasted the beef bones for an hour then throw them in the crock pot, fill with filtered water, add carrots, onions, a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar and fresh thyme springs and/or rosemary, oregano any thing you wish, then slow cook on low for 12 hours or so. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I made stock yesterday in our pressure cooker - oxtail bones, and the remains of three roast chickens, with some celery, peppercorns, about 400ml of cider vinegar, and then boiling water over the top to cover the bones.  They were frozen, and about a half inch below the top of the pressure cooker, so a rather large amount!  lid on, brought to the boil, turned down real low, and left for a good 4 hours, left to cool while I ate lunch, then bones out with a slotted spoon, the rest passed through a fine sieve, and this stock left to stand for a while till cool enough for the fridge, transferred to two smaller sealable containers, and into the fridge.  There's a thin layer of fat covering the top, and the stock is thick and gelatinous.  mmm mmm mmmmm. tasted lovely in a chicken curry.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.