KianaV

Haven't Eaten Meat in a While...

Recommended Posts

Hi there! Starting my first W30 Jan 2 and a bit nervous about the meat situation. I stopped eating meat, excepting fish, a few years ago because I don't like the hormones/antibiotics/environmental effects. I'm willing to add a little back in during Whole30, but would really like to rely mostly on fish and eggs. Any tips for types of meat that would be easy on my stomach after all this time, and sources for high-quality (but affordable) cuts? I'm thinking ground turkey?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first two Whole 30's I only ate eggs and fish as my animal proteins. This time around I'm eating meat of many varieties, but it's TOTALLY doable to just eat fish and eggs, as long as you like eggs (and I mean *really* like eggs) and can get a good variety of different fishes (salmon, tilapia, flounder, basa, American catfish, perch, cod, whiting, skate, crab, shrimp, lobster, squid, octopus, etc.). Otherwise it'd be just fine, but might get boring.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@KianaV  If you don't like hormones/antibiotics/bad environmental effects with your meat, it's totally possible to only eat meat from animals who were raised properly and have a positive impact on the environment.  I was a vegetarian for over a decade, but have been eating -good- meat for the past four years.  It can be difficult to find places to eat out, and it's more expensive, but I like to think of it as voting with my dollar and I know that I'm supporting good farmers and ranchers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The choice is completely yours, but in doing some research for myself, I've decided personally that I want to stick with chicken raised and processed in the US as my primary protein (and eggs). I'm also choosing to *not* give my money to companies who advertise "chicken raised with no hormones" or "our birds are never given antibiotics". I don't know where you're located, but if you're in the US, the use of growth hormones or steroids in chicken is strictly prohibited by the USDA. Regarding antibiotics, if a farmer chooses to treat a sick chicken with antibiotics, there is a waiting period before that bird can be sent to a processing plant to ensure that the antibiotics are no longer in their system. Sick birds require more food and water to grow than healthy birds, which isn't good for the environment. Sending sick birds for processing (so that a company can charge you more for "no antibiotics ever!") increases the risk of campylobacter and salmonella in processing plants, which increases the risk of humans getting sick. It's also not humane to let sick birds stay sick. 

This is *my* opinion and I wanted to share it. If you decide that you want to choose otherwise, it is *your* choice and if you're happy with your decision, then it was the right one for you :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now