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I have done as much internet combing as I know how to do (which, admittedly, isn't a ton), but I have yet to find a substantial source of information about the Craving Buster Reset mentioned on in Food Freedom Forever.

I am a nut fiend, especially since I don't care much for meat (though it still makes it onto my day-to-day menu).  Nuts are delicious, nutrient-dense, and (crucially) EASY!  However, the blurb about omitting nuts/seeds and dried fruit in FFF made me face the hard ugly truth: that I have been leaning far too heavily on nuts, and that that is probably not so great for my health.

So for this reason, as well as my history of psychologically-disordered relationships with food, I decided to undertake the Craving Buster Reset.  I want to be in complete control once and for all.  However, one of the reasons the Whole30's I've done in the past have worked so well for me is those clearly defined, black-and-white rules.  The rules for the Craving Buster, unfortunately, seem a bit more vague.  This could be because I have the audio version; so I may be missing a very informative graphic.  If not, though, is anyone here able to firm up the guidelines for me?

I'm mainly wondering about the nuts/seeds and which of their forms (ex: almond flour) are and are not allowed.

Not being a botanist, I'm also wondering if coconuts (which is a fruit, right? Are coconut chips dried fruit, then?), chia seeds (which I believe are technically a grain?), hemp hearts (hemp milk?), etc. are allowed.  THE FUTURE OF MY BREAKFAST IS AT STAKE HERE, PEOPLE.

Basically, a list of "Don't Eat These" would be most helpful.  More helpful still would be suggestions for substitutions, being that nuts and seeds made up a significant portion of my daily protein, vitamin, and mineral intake, and are, of course, also very filling and delicious!  (I already eat between 1/2 and 1 avocado/day.)  BONUS POINTS for more resources on the adverse effects of over nut-sumption.  I already have my nearest and dearest scratching their heads over why I'm eliminating MORE, so it would be nice to confidently tell them the reasoning.  Right now I just mumble "Er, anti-nutrients?" and change the subject.

Thinking of my salad tonight shivering and alone without its usual shower (read: monsoon) of toasted almonds fills me with despair.  All the different topping combinations are how I get myself to eat a ton of greens!  And, of course, nuts/seeds/dried fruit make up the bulk of those toppings.

Thanks so much in advance for any guidance!

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I have a simple suggestion. Do a Whole30 without nuts, seeds and dried fruit. See what happens and how you feel. You will be substituting higher quality fat and protein and nutrient dense foods and for the lower quality fat and limited protein of nuts and the sugar- bomb effects of dried fruit. You can eat as simply and conveniently as you choose without nuts, seeds and dry fruit. (See the Monomeal Mania thread by @kirkor if you want an extreme example. :))

What do you have to lose?

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Ya, coconut easily becomes FWB for many people, so it would not be a good choice if you are already struggling with nuts and fruits.  I'd focus on expanding your repertoire of vegetables, and increase use of fats like avocado and olive.

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Why not spend some time doing some research on nuts and the health concerns of over nut-supmtion?  I know it's easier to ask others to do the work for you, but it's more informative if you take your own concerns into your own hands and do the research.  You already have the reason tho, which you can confidently tell them.  I rely on them too much and they're not the greatest food out there that I could be eating... I'd rather remove them and make room for more nutrient dense foods.

I'm not sure what you're looking for substitutions for?  Nuts are not considered a protein on the Whole30 as they're higher in fat than protein so are you wanting to replace them with other fats?  Mayo, ghee, animal fats, avocado, olives, coconut (a drupe, not a nut) are all good choices.

As far as nuts and seeds for your breakfast, they're meant to be limited... think a closed handful every other day.  Why not try eating the same foods for breakfast that you eat for lunch and dinner instead of trying to recreate some sort of cereal?

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Oh, I feel you @zephyrroyale. I am a nut-holic and have been struggling with this because I love them so so much... filling and satisfying, portable and delicious, amazing textures, very grounding. Yes, salads seem so naked without them! I should probably do my next Whole30 without any nuts/seeds at all and see what happens. I have taken breaks of up to 10 days at a time but not noticed any significant difference... probably need to give it a longer trial. Please share any interesting research links/info you find about over nut-sumption. Basically, I just want to put my fingers in my ears and go "La la la la la" when this topic comes up!! *sigh*

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14 hours ago, SugarcubeOD said:

Why not spend some time doing some research on nuts and the health concerns of over nut-supmtion?  I know it's easier to ask others to do the work for you, but it's more informative if you take your own concerns into your own hands and do the research.  I definitely agree that my nutritional education is my responsibility.  I don't want to give the impression that the forum was my first stop.  But while I'm able to find the resources for the "why not's" about heavy nut consumption in general, the psychological factor is more of a niche topic. I was hoping for Whole30-specific guidance re: all the different ways nuts can be used (flours, milks, etc.) and where they fall (if at all) in the Craving Buster Reset methodology so I can glean the intended results. 

For example, snow peas are allowed on Whole30, but if all the more information I received was "no legumes", I would have left them out.  Not a big deal, to be sure, but if I really LOVED snow peas (like I LOVE coconut), I would be frustrated to have unnecessarily eliminated them and made an already challenging task like the Whole30 even more monolithic.  In other words, I can ask Wikipedia whether a coconut is a fruit, but that doesn't tell me if coconut chips, et al. are or are not recommended on this particular reset.  That's why I came to the forum.

You already have the reason tho, which you can confidently tell them.  I rely on them too much and they're not the greatest food out there that I could be eating... I'd rather remove them and make room for more nutrient dense foods.

I'm not sure what you're looking for substitutions for?  Substitution as in non-nut options that offer the same advantages like portability, palatability , nutrition, and diversity of application.

Nuts are not considered a protein on the Whole30 as they're higher in fat than protein so are you wanting to replace them with other fats?  Mayo, ghee, animal fats, avocado, olives, coconut (a drupe, not a nut) are all good choices.

As far as nuts and seeds for your breakfast, they're meant to be limited... think a closed handful every other day.  Why not try eating the same foods for breakfast that you eat for lunch and dinner instead of trying to recreate some sort of cereal? I do mix in egg and veggie dishes into my mornings, but a banana with almond butter has been a favorite dashing out the door option.  Obviously, that would not be an option on this reset, but I have been enjoying chia seed puddings (made with coconut milk) as a convenient, make-ahead option.  Where do those fall?

 

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13 hours ago, vozelle said:

Oh, I feel you @zephyrroyale. I am a nut-holic and have been struggling with this because I love them so so much... filling and satisfying, portable and delicious, amazing textures, very grounding. Yes, salads seem so naked without them! I should probably do my next Whole30 without any nuts/seeds at all and see what happens. I have taken breaks of up to 10 days at a time but not noticed any significant difference... probably need to give it a longer trial. Please share any interesting research links/info you find about over nut-sumption. Basically, I just want to put my fingers in my ears and go "La la la la la" when this topic comes up!! *sigh*

Solidarity!  I will die smiling with a mouthful of almond butter!

Seriously, though, if I find some good articles I will be sure to link back.  Thanks so much for contributing! :)

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7 minutes ago, zephyrroyale said:

But while I'm able to find the resources for the "why not's" about heavy nut consumption in general, the psychological factor is more of a niche topic. I was hoping for Whole30-specific guidance re: all the different ways nuts can be used (flours, milks, etc.) and where they fall (if at all) in the Craving Buster Reset methodology so I can glean the intended results. 

Well the psychological factor is going to be personal to each person.  I personally could care less about nuts... never eat them, never think about them... barely ever use their products (milks/butters/flours).

If you personally have issues with nuts psychologically that you seem to be saying you do, the only way to manage that and reset it is to cut the offending products out. If you have no problem with a splash of almond milk in your coffee but you can't eat a salad without dreaming of showers of nuts and seeds, then you could probably leave the milk and ditch the nuts and seeds... get what I'm saying?

I believe that the resets in the book are more to be decided upon and managed by each person wanting to do the reset... it's not the Whole30 and there aren't steadfast rules about what you can and can't have... you make that up on your own.

As far as substitutions, it depends on what your'e eating the nuts for... there are myriad options for portable foods on this forum... google 'whole30 picnic' or 'whole30 brown bag lunch' for options.  I think you are overestimating the nutritional value of nuts/seeds as well... they're actually not a great dietary choice due to their unbalanced fat profile, their ability to be very gut disruptive and their food without brakes status.

With the chia pudding, it's hard to say where it falls because you're not doing a whole30.  If you were, we'd say that they have no place in your whole30, they replicate sweet breakfast items, they are not nutritionally balanced and they will likely leave you hungry and craving during the day.  Same with a banana/almond butter situation.  That said, because you're not doing a Whole30, you get to decide where they fit, if at all.

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1 hour ago, SugarcubeOD said:

If you personally have issues with nuts psychologically that you seem to be saying you do, the only way to manage that and reset it is to cut the offending products out. If you have no problem with a splash of almond milk in your coffee but you can't eat a salad without dreaming of showers of nuts and seeds, then you could probably leave the milk and ditch the nuts and seeds... get what I'm saying?

I've noticed that when I cut them out completely, I just fantasize about them more, feeling deprived and rebellious!! I normally eat them in what I had considered moderation (never been a binge eater), but here in Whole30 Land "one closed handful every other day" seems small by comparison.  : (

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6 minutes ago, vozelle said:

here in Whole30 Land

But none of us live in Whole30 land. We're here for 30 days only. After that you use what you've learned to figure out what works for you. THe 'closed handful every other day, max' doesn't apply outside of the 30days. Outside of the 30 days you get to decide on what foods you're going to eat. There are no good or bad foods, just consequences, and those consequences are different for each & every one of us.

Identify your triggers, and then work towards developing new reactions rather than acting on impulse. Engage your brain, not just your hand. Mindful eating isn;t just about being mindful of what you're eating in the here & now. It's about being mindful of how those foods effect in the future. If it means you have to stop & count to 10 & then re-think each time you reach for the nuts, do it. New neural pathways are not developed over night, but eventually you'll shrug and walk away.

 

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My own experience has taught me the following:

  • I can have nuts and dried fruit on salads or as accents in a cauliflower rice "pilaf" but not as food out of my hand. YMMV.
  • I cut out coconut flakes and coconut butter -- they were too easy to become munchie treats.
  • Nut butter. I just don't buy it, exception is sunflower seed butter w/o sweetener but even that I have to use with caution.

Substitutions 

  1. more protein, fat and veggies at each meal
  2. Rooibos or other tea when I feel snacky
  3. Another very real option, and I think a lot of people pooh-pooh this, but really stop and take note of when you want that crunchy thing. Analyze why. Take a walk or set timer for 15 minutes. It's probably a craving.
  4. If it's not a craving, and you still want to eat in 15 minutes, eat something like sardines. Stock up on cans to stash in your desk, cupboard, car. They're actually quite delicious, but you won't eat them if you're just feeling snacky.

 

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http://whole30.com/2016/09/fff-faq/

Do I have to do the Whole30 program to benefit from Food Freedom Forever?

No, although I highly encourage it. I’ll explain in FFF why the Whole30 is the best reset on the block, and why you really should consider giving it a go… but if (for a number of reasons) you’re just not ready or able to complete the Whole30 as written, I’ve outlined a number of reset protocols that will change your health, habits, and relationship with food, and give you the foundation to continue on with my food freedom plan. Your reset options include:

  • The Whole30
  • Craving-Buster Reset
  • Anti-Inflammatory Reset
  • Vegan Reset
  • Basic Reset
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3 hours ago, jmcbn said:

But none of us live in Whole30 land. We're here for 30 days only. After that you use what you've learned to figure out what works for you. THe 'closed handful every other day, max' doesn't apply outside of the 30days. Outside of the 30 days you get to decide on what foods you're going to eat. There are no good or bad foods, just consequences, and those consequences are different for each & every one of us.

Identify your triggers, and then work towards developing new reactions rather than acting on impulse. Engage your brain, not just your hand. Mindful eating isn;t just about being mindful of what you're eating in the here & now. It's about being mindful of how those foods effect in the future. If it means you have to stop & count to 10 & then re-think each time you reach for the nuts, do it. New neural pathways are not developed over night, but eventually you'll shrug and walk away.

 

Thanks, great reminder!  : )

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