PappyPaul

Type 2 Diabetic - What "Good" foods should I avoid?

Recommended Posts

Today is day 30 for me, and for the most part I feel GREAT! The only thing keeping me from feeling less than COMPLETELY great is that my blood sugar numbers haven't drastically improved. They have gone from 130s and 140s to mostly in the 110s. But today it was 133 and my 'feeling great" day kind of crash landed. 

 

I had already decided I was going to keep going for 30 more days because after so many years of abusing my body, I need another 30 days to help the healing "take" or whatever the right term may be. 

 

I'm using the Real Plans meal planner and have actually been enjoying my new food choices quite a bit, but after reading thru some other posts here, I realize that just because food is good for Whole30 may not mean it is good for me in my situation.  I have attached screenshots of my Whole30 meal plans, and I could use some advice as to what I should alter or avoid as a diabetic.

 

 

meal-plan.png

meal-plan-1.png

meal-plan-2.png

meal-plan-3.png

meal-plan-4.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Medical doctors don't advise others over the internet. They need to examine bloodwork and history because there's way too much liability.

For good numbers to continue, the good habits and changes have to continue.

This is where you're going to learn how to ride your bike....with your doctors's monitoring. You keep going, adding things back in, testing your blood sugar and if it doesn't work, you go back to the foods that are working.  

Alcohol messes with the pancreas/blood sugar.  Tread lightly with that and too much coffee, ditto.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bravo, PappyPaul for Day 30.  

For the healing to "take" after Day 30, for the diabetic... Falling back into whatever it was you were doing preW30 will bring T2 right back where it was. T1 and T2, along with all of the other autoimmune/thyroid/pancreas disorders are health conditions that you don't bounce in and out of - by 4 weeks on and 4 weeks off of refined foods.  It takes persistent consistency to see lasting results.

There's no real going back to those refined foods or drinks that brought diabetes to your door. It is patently unfair but genetics and food choices all come into play with consequences.  Even after a few years of consistency, the same health problems come back enforce when  whole foods are replaced with refined foods.

Even after years of tweaking, some learn that they still need medicine to manage their health condition.  Good food helps everything but it doesn't heal everything either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey PappyPaul,

Congrats on reaching Day 30! This is Day 31 for me, so I'm really feeling where you're at. *high-five*

Now, about your topic...

I have Type 2, and I've had it under control without meds for a little over a year now. I know that's not possible for everyone, but I'm thankful for it. (For me "control" means that I consistently test under the pre-diabetic threshold with my A1C, and my daily results with my monitor range from 70 to 110, depending on time day, proximity to meals. My daily numbers were close to 300 when I was diagnosed.)

I've got a great doctor who really encourages me take a strong role in my own treatment, and we talk things over before figuring out the next step where all my health issues are concerned. He's very open to dietary changes and supplements with strong evidence. I hope you've got someone good in your corner!

As far as "good foods" to avoid, the only thing on your menu plan that really jumps out at me would be bananas — they're a sugar-packed and starchy fruit. They might not cause you problems, but they do cause spikes for many diabetics.

One thing that helped me get my number down was the addition of Ceylon cinnamon in my diet (which I now take in capsule form with meals). I'd recommend Googling "Type 2 diabetes + Ceylon cinnamon" for study info that you could bring up with your own doctor.

Also, keep in mind it takes time. It took months for my blood sugar to get down and stay down.

Whatever the future holds for you, keep making good choices — like you did when you started W30!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you @MeadowLily and @Eccentrica !  I'm feeling good with the path I am on, and looking forward to another solid 30 days of strictness. I have definitely put bread in my rear-view, and I know I can eat healthy and still eat good.

 

I'll cut out the bananas, that won't be an issue for me. I just was hoping to make sure some of the things I have really learned to enjoy over the past 30 days aren't 'hidden triggers' for me - broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, avocado, brussel sprouts, cabbage, spaghetti squash, acorn squash...

I never imagined how good those things tasted...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PappyPaul, I don't want to marsh anyone's mellow but there's no such thing as the Finish Line.  I've been pushing against T2 for three years now. 

Food becomes fuel rather than entertainment. Those old playfoods or things like white bread convert into sugar faster than you can say....a starch to a sugar or from a Jack to a King.

Keep tooling along and visit more often. Mill around and shoot the breeze. Showing up is 100% of success.  Keep your WHY close by.  Remind yourself why you're doing this. Having some accountability friends helps.  Virtual hugs are not the same as real ones but we're all in this together.  We want to live, live, live....in health.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Pappy Paul,

I'm a type 1 diabetic and have been doing a Whole 30 type diet for two years.  It is great that you feel better (me too), and I think if you look at your post-meal blood sugars (one and two hours after meals), you will probably find that is where you are having the biggest difference.

There are some things that are okay for Whole 30 that I've found I can't have.  Bananas, unfortunately, are one of them (and I loved the Elvis burgers from Well Fed, but had to give those up).  I think, if you do post-meal testing, you may find the sweet potatoes tend to spike blood sugars as well (I have given up many sweet potato recipes as well).  I see you are having a lot of the Sweet Potato Chili from One Lovely Life.  There is another recipe from her site, Slow Cooker Butter Chicken, that is lower carb that is really really good that may be a good substitute.

Blood Sugar 101 by Jenny Ruhl is a really good book for Type 2 diabetics.  According to her research, if your post-meal readings are below 140, you have a good chance of avoiding diabetic complications.  She also mentions which foods are good for diabetics.  Generally, fruits and starchy vegetables will raise blood sugars (though they seem to be the staples of many Whole 30 recipes). Once you go off the Whole 30, you may find that full-fat dairy is very satisfying and low-carb.

Good luck! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

i am a T2 diabetic and I agree with everything krenzel16 said. 

Test after your meals to discover what works for you.  Eat to your meter,

Some problem foods for me are fruits such as apples, pears, and bananas and plantains. Also starchy veggies such as sweet potatoes, white potatoes and winter squash. Cooked tomato sauce also can up my blood sugar reads.  I have found that I can eat a very small portion of these starchy or sugary foods in an otherwise low carb meal but cannot eat a normal sized serving.  Non starchy veggies are ok.  Be aware that very large portions of protein can also spike blood sugar in some people.

Quantity counts.  Suggest checking carb counts of your favorite recipes to help you decide on portion size that works for you and if you can eat it at all. Spaghetti squash and acorn squash may pose a problem or they may be ok in a smaller portion  Testing is the only way to know how meals work for you.  

Also, read labels for any prepared food you eat.  Sugar in many forms is a sneaky ingredient in the most innocent looking foods  

Good luck.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way, a good substitute for spaghetti squash noodles is zucchini noodles.  I make mine with a potato peeler.  Sauté for a few minutes in olive oil or clarified butter/ghee.  If you use jarred tomato pasta sauces, be sure to check ingredients and look for low carb versions. Sugar is often added to pasta sauces but there are some good ones that fit the whole30 and low carb rules.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/26/2017 at 7:52 AM, Artistcam said:

By the way, a good substitute for spaghetti squash noodles is zucchini noodles.  I make mine with a potato peeler.  Sauté for a few minutes in olive oil or clarified butter/ghee.  If you use jarred tomato pasta sauces, be sure to check ingredients and look for low carb versions. Sugar is often added to pasta sauces but there are some good ones that fit the whole30 and low carb rules.  

What do you mean by 'low carb versions'?  Whole30 is not a low carb plan... Yes, sugar is added, so we do want people to make sure the ingredients are compliant but I just don't get the 'low carb' part of your post...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know this isn't a low carb diet but people with diabetes have to be aware of the carbs they consume which can be done within the context of Whole30.  One way of checking for sugar in prepared foods is to check the carb counts which shouldn't be too high.

 Diabetes is a very serious disease!  There are plenty of Whole30 allowable foods one can eat without endangering your health.  I was just trying to help someone who is trying to get healthy.  We are all different in what foods we can eat and be healthy.  Sorry if I offended anyone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi @Artistcam - Whole30 is generally much lower carb than most traditional eating plans to begin with because we eliminate all the grains and sugars that are prevalent in most standard eating habits. The carbohydrates that come in to a person's Whole30 eating plan are in healthy, whole foods that are the sum of more than just their macronutrients. The sugar in tomatoes is bound to the fibre and micronutrients in them which is a heck of a lot different than a person eating a mars bar and needing to know the sugar load.

If you are concerned, you are free to seek out medical opinion as no one here is a doctor or equipped to dole out medical advice. That said, we do not ask people, diabetic or otherwise, to concern themselves with the carbohydrate count on something like tinned tomatoes or jarred marinara sauce. Because the person isn't consuming the sauce as a stand alone, but rather with the protein and fat of a template meal, the carbohydrate in the tomato shouldn't be an issue.

We are well aware that diabetes is a serious condition and no one was trying to minimize that. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now