my homemade mayo doesn't taste good!


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Hi, 

I'm on day 4 of my whole30. I tried to make a batch of mayo the other day, and the taste and smell of the olive oil is just overwhelming!  Even though I'm using a "light" tasting oil. Am I doing something wrong? I never used olive oil regularly before.

I guess I'm just used to the tastelessness of canola oil.  Is there any comparatively tasteless oil? 

 

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12 minutes ago, Kaylee1 said:

 

Hi, 

I'm on day 4 of my whole30. I tried to make a batch of mayo the other day, and the taste and smell of the olive oil is just overwhelming!  Even though I'm using a "light" tasting oil. Am I doing something wrong? I never used olive oil regularly before.

I guess I'm just used to the tastelessness of canola oil.  Is there any comparatively tasteless oil? 

 

Try with avocado oil.

If you look at the commercial non-canola mayos available (Primal Kitchen, Chosen Foods), they all use avocado oil instead. 

 

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I honestly don't like mayo, homemade or regular, but I need something to add to protein salads so I gave it a try today with avocado oil and it turned out okay.  Edible when added to something else, at least imo.

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I use "extra light tasting" olive oil, not just light olive oil.  Sometimes I blend it with macadamia nut oil (I'm allergic to avocado but I hear that's a good option too). Also, I like to use lime juice to make it instead of vinegar or lemon juice.  The rest is up to your tastes as far as salt, wasabi, garlic, mustard, etc.  

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I've read that olive oil becomes bitter somehow in the process of making mayo. I'm not sure what causes it. While I don't think I've experienced this, I've noticed what I make doesn't have the amount of tanginess I like in store-bought mayos and seems kind of bland. I ended up googling this and found a message board that said to substitute Dijon mustard for the mustard powder. Instant improvement (just make sure the Dijon doesn't have white wine in it).

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11 minutes ago, HJKlingm said:

I've read that olive oil becomes bitter somehow in the process of making mayo. I'm not sure what causes it. While I don't think I've experienced this, I've noticed what I make doesn't have the amount of tanginess I like in store-bought mayos and seems kind of bland. I ended up googling this and found a message board that said to substitute Dijon mustard for the mustard powder. Instant improvement (just make sure the Dijon doesn't have white wine in it).

There's some chemistry and physics to the bitterness if you use extra virgin olive oil. I swear by Berio Extra Light [TASTING] olive oil as it has a neutral taste. And use Dijon mustard (Annie's has a compliant one--but always read the label! Products can change. 

From Serious Eats Two-Minute Mayo:

Quote

It's possible to make a truly tasty mayonnaise by using high-quality extra-virgin olive oil, but there's a problem: Blenders, food processors, and hand blenders are too powerful. 

You see, extra-virgin olive oil droplets are composed of many tiny fragments, many of which are bound tightly together, preventing our taste buds from picking them up. Whip the olive oil with enough vigor by, say, using a food processor or blender, and you end up shearing those bitter-tasting fragments apart from each other. The result is a mayonnaise with a markedly bitter flavor. Not only that, but these tiny fragments actually decrease the efficacy of emulsifiers like mustard and lecithin, making your sauce more likely to break.

So, what if you want an ultra-stable mayonnaise that's still strongly flavored with extra-virgin olive oil, but has no bitterness? The key is to use a neutral-flavored oil, like canola or vegetable, to start your mayonnaise. Once it's stable, transfer it to a bowl and whisk in some extra-virgin olive oil by hand. You'll still get plenty of flavor, but none of the bitterness.

 

 

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I use the Fillipo Berio extra light tasting olive oil as well. I switched to a different light olive oil once and it tasted really off to me; almost rancid. Of course I had purchased it in a large container! So I went back to the brand I know and trust and buy it in a 16 oz. container at a time. The juice of half a lemon adds a lot to the flavor. I love the stuff!

Stephanie

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24 minutes ago, Bellmaestra said:

I use the Fillipo Berio extra light tasting olive oil as well. I switched to a different light olive oil once and it tasted really off to me; almost rancid. Of course I had purchased it in a large container! So I went back to the brand I know and trust and buy it in a 16 oz. container at a time. The juice of half a lemon adds a lot to the flavor. I love the stuff!

Stephanie

That Filippo Berio oil really is terrific. I can use the large container by keeping it in a dark cupboard. 

Filippo Berio Extra Light Tasting Olive Oil

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