Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

thatjenn

Can I have nutritional yeast?

Recommended Posts

I searched the forums, and did a little Googling. Google seems to think that paleo folks are split on it, and the paleo people who discount nutritional yeast mostly do so on historical grounds, not health grounds. So - yea or nay? I'm asking because I love its flavor and tend to mix it in with things when I want a cheesy flavor without cheese, and so it just might save me. :)

(I'm on day -1 of my whole30... going grocery shopping tonight after a couple of weeks of reading and making substitutions as a warm-up.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thatjenn -

Nutritional yeast is fine, just beware that (and I'm not sure if this is possible...) you aren't using it to fill the cheese void...

My research also indicates that you may want to be careful to source a "gluten free" yeast, as some of them can contain trace amounts. It seems that Bob's Red Mill is safe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also was wondering about nutritional yeast. I used to use it to season kale chips, but stopped when I started the whole 30 because I'm not sure what it is and where it comes from. What is it, exactly?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a single-celled eukaryote. Nutritional yeast is similar to the yeast used in brewing or bread making. On the one hand, those are longstanding human interactions with a microorganism and fermentation is a natural process. On the other hand, the tasty little flakes of nutritional yeast are grown in nutrient media in big vats and then dried out for our consumption, which seems kind of industrial. I really love the stuff, too, though. It just tastes good to me, and sometimes I think I crave it for the B vitamins. I don't think of it as a substitute for cheese though. It is a seasoning that provides "umami" (the fifth basic taste).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for solving the mystery. I wonder if you can grow it at home...it's probably like trying to grow penicillin though. Too scientific.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, you can brew beer at home, you just have to keep everything clean so that it doesn't get infected with something else. So you probably could grow yeast, but only some strains are tasty. Regular brewers yeast is kind of bitter and funky tasting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites