Why Not Organic/Grass Fed?


SydneyKay

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As I am started Whole30 I have really been wondering why the food is not required to be grass-fed and/or organic? If resetting your body is getting rid of any unnatural additives/foods and preservatives why is this not affected by pesticides?  Maybe I have a misunderstanding of how pesticides impact our food but wouldn't this get into our system and defeat the purpose of Whole30? 

Why does this choice not matter in the resetting of our bodies? Additionally, will Whole30 work better or could you get better results by only eating organic, grass-fed meats and veggies? 

 

Thank you all!  

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Choice definitely does matter however the plan has to be balanced between what is "perfect" and what is accessible. If the requirement was only grassfed organic meats and only organic fruits and vegetables, how many people do you think could do it? Logistics aside in areas where these sorts of foods aren't even available, the cost is prohibitive for many people.

If you have the means and desire to go this route then yes, that is the absolute best thing for both your body and the environment. For people without the means or motivation to go to these lengths, we say to eliminate the "no" foods, eat protein you can afford (trimming or draining the fat of conventional animals) and lots of veggies and good fats. 

The purpose of the Whole30 isn't to eliminate all additives and pesticides but to give yourself as clean a slate as possible and then reintroduce known inflammatory foods and see how your body reacts. This can be done with or without organic/grass fed.

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14 hours ago, SydneyKay said:

As I am started Whole30 I have really been wondering why the food is not required to be grass-fed and/or organic? If resetting your body is getting rid of any unnatural additives/foods and preservatives why is this not affected by pesticides?  Maybe I have a misunderstanding of how pesticides impact our food but wouldn't this get into our system and defeat the purpose of Whole30? 

Why does this choice not matter in the resetting of our bodies? Additionally, will Whole30 work better or could you get better results by only eating organic, grass-fed meats and veggies? 

 

Thank you all!  

When I first started my Whole30 journey about 3.5 years ago I didn't buy anything organic or grass-fed. And I felt AMAZING. Over time, we have slowly replaced our beef with grass-fed, and purchase more organic veggies as our budget allows. It is a slow process, but I feel like it has to be to be sustainable and long lasting. Both my fiance and I were in a very different financial situation 3 years ago and if we had tried to switch everything over at once we would have become frustrated (and broke!) and probably would have given up.

This is actually the thing I love most about the Whole30 program - it is 100% free and accessible to everyone, just like @ladyshanny says in her reply. If you have the means and the opportunity to purchase all grass-fed and organic meat and produce and you want to, then you should! But anyone can reap the benefits by making it work for their budget!

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Making a rule that everything must be organic/grass-fed would also turn this program into something exceptionally elitist and unachievable for many people who would benefit greatly from it. If that had been the case for me in my first Whole30, I would have looked at the prices of those items and said forget it because I couldn't (and still can't) afford it. 

I've also done a lot of research into the allowable pesticides/herbicides in organic fruits and vegetables for my own personal education, but I'm not going to turn this thread into a debate over organic vs conventional pesticides.

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There are also plenty of, say, local farms that have great produce/meats that are raised in fantastic conditions in a sustainable way, possibly even organically, but are not USDA Organic certified.  The way I understand it, the organic certification is pretty pricey and carries certain requirements that may not be realistic for smaller farms.  

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2 hours ago, slc_melissa said:

There are also plenty of, say, local farms that have great produce/meats that are raised in fantastic conditions in a sustainable way, possibly even organically, but are not USDA Organic certified.  The way I understand it, the organic certification is pretty pricey and carries certain requirements that may not be realistic for smaller farms.  

Definitely! We did a 20 week summer CSA share at a local farm, and they are not certified organic but they use 100% organic farming practices. So sad that it costs so much :( 

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I  Live near Amish farms which rarely have organic certification but farming practices are old fashion and if I have questions I could just ask the farmer. I picked up eggs today and could see the chickens running around and the eggs were layed this morning. They use non-gmo soy free feed.  So funtunate to have these resources near by but it's not the case for everyone nor can everyone pay $3.50 for a dozen eggs. 

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