Recommended Posts

"Ribose is classified as a monosaccharide. Unlike glucose, ribose is not directly oxidized to provide energy for cellular metabolism. Rather, ribose is incorporated into molecules that are used to transfer energy from place to place within your cells. It also serves as a critical structural component of chromosomes and forms the basis of the transcriptional apparatus which translates genes into proteins. " from Livestrong.com.

It supposedly has a mildly sweet taste, but, like Stevia, not one everyone likes.

I'm interested because my wife has heart failure and D-Ribose is o recommended for it.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Moderators
2 hours ago, Richard Brownkatz said:

I'm interested because my wife has heart failure and D-Ribose is o recommended for it.

If this has been prescribed by a doctor to your wife then she may have it and whether it follows the rules or not is moot.  If it's one of those things like Acai or other super foods that people say is great for xyz, like a glass of red wine a day is good for xyz then no.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 11 months later...
  • 3 weeks later...
  • 10 months later...

I'm taking D-Ribose and I'm not going to stop. It's not being "used" to make things sweet or recreate recipes. If Whole30 doesn't understand the absolute critical role D-Ribose has in the heart the it needs a serious update. I'm taking it and I'm still Whole30 compliant. It's not swypo and if anyone running Whole30 did research on how incredibly valuable D-Ribose is they'd recommend it. Also adding in CoQ10, L-Carnetine fumerate and transdermal magnesium are keys for heart health and regeneration. There's a free book on audible and kindle by Dr. Sinatra...he's a metabolic cardiologist. Your wife can do Whole30 for her health and still gain the benefits I'll go toe to toe with anyone who claims it's non compliant just on "principle"...adding in those 4 supplements can actually heal her heart...they've recently added in vitamin K-2 (the mk7 form) which moves calcium out of soft tissue and into the bones. Good luck and when it comes to life saving supplements...you don't need permission from anyone..

Link to post
Share on other sites

Limited studies have shown that people with coronary artery disease may benefit from taking extra D-Ribose, but outside those circumstances, your body makes it on its own and supplementation is not necessary. You can also get Ribose from foods like beef and eggs. 

Again, though, if it has been recommended by a person's doctor (and not some doctor on the internet), it's fair game. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...