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LilliMarlene

Bone broth - do I need a pressure cooker?

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Absolutely not. You can do this on the stove, in a slow cooker, or using a pressure cooker. Any of those methods works, the difference just comes down to how long it cooks and how much potential babysitting you need to do with it (i.e., I'll check much more often on a pot sitting on my stove for 10 hours than I will on a crock cooking 10 hours on low).

https://wholefully.com/bone-broth/  She has a very detailed explanation of how she does things and why, with tips on how to save time and money when it comes to the veggies included in the broth)

https://wellnessmama.com/5888/bone-broth/  Another example by a different blogger.

Anytime you come across something that seems to be made a certain way and you can't do that method for whatever reason, just try googling "(insert food/recipe here) (insert method you'd prefer to use)" like "bone broth stove top" or "spaghetti squash crock pot". It usually happens that someone has already managed it (or at least tried it and shared the results) when I go searching for alternatives, and it winds up saving me the time of trying to figure it out on my own :D 

Good luck making your broth!

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@LilliMarlene Call me old fashion, but I actually prefer my bone broth cooked on the stove.

@Jihanna I do the same thing when I’m searching for ways to make certain recipes with the tools I actually own.  I had to do this for making mayo in my vitamix blender after an epic fail.  What would we do without Uncle Google 

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If you're using the stove top, and you have a large pot with a pasta insert, but all the solids in the pasta insert. It makes removing them at the end a cinch.

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I make mine of the stove top in a giant stock pot, my pressure cooker and slow cooker aren't big enough for the bulk lots I make. 

I just get it on in the morning, simmer til I go to bed, leave it off overnight, and crank it back up in the morning for the rest of the next day. 

In summer, when the house doesn't cool down overnight I might put it in the fridge, but during winter the bottom half of the house isn't heated overnight and it's safe enough (I've worked many high end restaurants and they all leave their stock on the stove overnight with the burner off)

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