BjjBandit

I love Olivado, but is it allowed?

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Hey Everyone

Im super new to the Whole30 game, so just looking for a bit of guidance. I got put onto this diet by a bunch of team mates at my Dojo that swear it has kicked their engine into over- over-drive so I had to give it a go. I've always been very conscious of what I put into my body, and the effect said food is having on the environment. A few years ago another mate of mine put me onto Olivado Avocado oil, tastes great and works really well at high temps, which when combined with what I was reading about much of their supply chain and production being fuelled by bio-fuels they were making from the off-cuts/bi-products, it tickled all my fancies. I attached an image of the bottle also incase someone can decipher an answer to my question from the label. 

Anyway, Im really keen to give this diet a really good swing and make sure that I'm doing it properly. I saw that there were some oils on the approved items list, but would like to stick with what I know where possible and was hoping someone could let me know if I can stick with my Olivado or let me know exactly what I need to look for on the bottles to make sure I am compliant.

Any guidance you can give me to soften my noob curve would be great.

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Cheers for that!!

I had a read through the information in the links you sent (a lot of details to learn!). Im glad that avocado oil gets the big tick, but while I was down the rabbit hole I read up on the various extraction methods of oil. I was wondering if you could give me any guidance on what is the cleanest and healthiest form of avocado oil (cold press, unrefined, extra virgin... etc). Seems like the devil really is in the details here!

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I'm a bit skeptical about all the different terms that oil companies use when describing their products and how theyre made

Heaps of it just sounds like a bunch of marketing terms to me like "pure" oil, "light" oil, "cold-pressed" or "cold-extracted" oil (is there even a difference), "extra triple ultra virgin" oil, "centrifuge" extracted

What is actually legit oil? And what is just marketing? Does it need to be Whole30 approved to use it on the diet?

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17 hours ago, jimmychur said:

Does it need to be Whole30 approved to use it on the diet?

No, as long as there are no non-compliant ingredients in any product, it is approved for the program.  They are not the only products that you can use.

As far as all the buzz words, Whole30 doesn't have a stand on which ones are legit, which ones are marketing and which ones are bunk.  I think it comes down to each individual to do more general non-Whole30 specific research on this type of question as they feel necessary.

Our Whole30 Approved® label is designed to let you know a product is 100% compliant with the rules of our Whole30 program, and that the product line and company who stands behind it has been vetted by our team. Furthermore, all Whole30 Approved products containing animal protein have met our established Animal Welfare Standards, as created in partnership with the ASPCA.

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Thanks sugarcube

I had a look at whole30 approved oils and since this post is about avo oil and primal kitchen came up

They've got two avo oils, which both say they're approved

The extra virgin oil is like twice the price of the other one!

https://www.primalkitchen.com/collections/avocado-oil/products/avocado-oil
https://www.primalkitchen.com/collections/avocado-oil/products/extra-virgin-avocado-oil

I just wonder what the difference is?? The first one must be a refined oil as it would say it's not on the label if it wasn't yknow

I read the rules again, a few times, and it doesn't specifically say refined oils are out of the program. Is that right? I read on the Can I have page you link in your signature, and it says this: "While we don’t think vegetable oils are a healthy choice (understatement of the century), we don’t expressly rule them out on the Whole30."

https://whole30.com/the-official-can-i-have-guide-to-the-whole30/

I couldn't find much more information about oil than that, is there a page specifically about oils and what the rules are around oils? I did see that soya is out

Oil seems like the bad guy a lot of the time but it's hard to cook without it so getting it right seems important

Also cheaper if you don't have to get the fancy stuff

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22 hours ago, jimmychur said:

"While we don’t think vegetable oils are a healthy choice (understatement of the century), we don’t expressly rule them out on the Whole30."

The other half of that quote is: 

 If we did, you’d never be able to eat outside of your own kitchen, because all restaurants use them in cooking. We wanted to create the healthiest program possible, but we also need it to be do-able for those who travel for business or pleasure, or simply want to dine out during the month.

Tip: Eliminate the consumption of vegetable oils at home, even if you’re not on the Whole30, and make sure the rest of your diet is focused on the most nutritious choices possible, especially if you dine out frequently.

So yes, if you are following just the bare rules of the program, technically vegetable is not ruled out so that people can eat outside their homes - there are no Whole30 police so if you don't eat out and eat these oils in your own cooking, no one is going to come find you.

With that said, our recommendation for people to get the most out of the program would be to remove these inflammatory types of oils for the 30 days.

Again, for the differences between extra virgin, first press, cold press, refined etc, you'd do best to do that research out in the greater interwebs instead of focusing on it within the Whole30 community.  We are ingredient focused, not process of making focused so you might find more information about what all the different processing types of oil mean on a cooking forum or other related websites.  Once you get into that part of deciding about what your food needs to be, every person will have a different outlook.  For instance I do not eat things with artificial flavors after having done research on how they're made but they are not against the rules within the Whole30.  That's an extra thing I add in to both Whole30's that I do and my Food Freedom.  Yours might be something around how oil is processed and what matters most to you in that regard within your budget and resources.

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On 4/4/2020 at 11:46 AM, SugarcubeOD said:

The other half of that quote is: 

 If we did, you’d never be able to eat outside of your own kitchen, because all restaurants use them in cooking. We wanted to create the healthiest program possible, but we also need it to be do-able for those who travel for business or pleasure, or simply want to dine out during the month.

Tip: Eliminate the consumption of vegetable oils at home, even if you’re not on the Whole30, and make sure the rest of your diet is focused on the most nutritious choices possible, especially if you dine out frequently.

So yes, if you are following just the bare rules of the program, technically vegetable is not ruled out so that people can eat outside their homes - there are no Whole30 police so if you don't eat out and eat these oils in your own cooking, no one is going to come find you.

With that said, our recommendation for people to get the most out of the program would be to remove these inflammatory types of oils for the 30 days.

Again, for the differences between extra virgin, first press, cold press, refined etc, you'd do best to do that research out in the greater interwebs instead of focusing on it within the Whole30 community.  We are ingredient focused, not process of making focused so you might find more information about what all the different processing types of oil mean on a cooking forum or other related websites.  Once you get into that part of deciding about what your food needs to be, every person will have a different outlook.  For instance I do not eat things with artificial flavors after having done research on how they're made but they are not against the rules within the Whole30.  That's an extra thing I add in to both Whole30's that I do and my Food Freedom.  Yours might be something around how oil is processed and what matters most to you in that regard within your budget and resources.

Thanks for the awesome reply, I missed this earlier. I do think oils is something good to focus on. Hard part is getting around the hocus pocus terms out there!

I try use the best oils I can afford where I can.

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