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I’m having trouble finding the most basic recipes for example basic egg salad, tuna salad, meat loaf, meat balls, chicken soup. I don’t want different twists on traditional recipes. I want the traditional recipes that are changed just enough to be compliant.  
 

 

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I'm not sure there's any one site that has just basics.

For things like egg and tuna salad, look at your favorite recipes and figure out which things aren't Whole30 compatible. For some of these ingredients, you'll just need to switch brands for some things. So, make sure your tuna doesn't have soy, find a Whole30 compatible mayo. If you used sweet pickle relish before, that's going to have to change, since there's really no compatible sweet pickles, so decide if you want diced pickles, or if you want to skip that ingredient. 

Meatballs and meatloaf are harder, because they typically use bread crumbs.  Here is a recipe for an Italian meatball -- you do not have to do the sauce too, you can do the meatballs and find a jarred marinara sauce that's Whole30 compatible, if that's more your style, but the meatballs themselves should be good.

I am not really a meatloaf fan myself and have never bothered to find a Whole30 compatible recipe, so I'm not sure where to find a good recipe for that.

I would also say there are foods that you don't necessarily need a recipe for, and also that your meals don't always have to be pretty. This can be good to remember when you're frustrated and tired of cooking. I buy frozen hamburger patties that are whole30 compatible, and when I don't feel like cooking anything else, I can cook one of those straight from the freezer, steam a bag of frozen vegetables, add some fat in the form of avocado or olives or mayo or nuts, and it's a meal. It's not the most exciting meal, and if I did it every day I'd be bored out of my mind, but it's an easy meal when I need it. Eggs are easy too, or cans of tuna. 

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I've been trying to think of a good option for you. Honestly, it's hard to recommend one cookbook that's going to have exactly what you're looking for, especially if you want it to also be Whole30 compatible. 

I think you could go about this one of three ways, and none of them are right or wrong, you're going to have to decide what will work best for you.

Option one could be expensive, and may not be an option outside of the US, but limits how much cooking you do -- find meal services, pre-made meals, or restaurants in your area that offer Whole30 compatible options. There are links to some Here -- you can filter it so you just see Restaurants and Meal Delivery, and then by state. 

Option two is kind of ramping up to Whole30 by learning some basic recipes and cooking techniques, while not committing to a full Whole30 just yet. This could mean trying one or two Whole30 recipes each week, or it could mean finding your perfect version of tuna salad or meatloaf and then figuring out what it is you like about it so you can figure out how to change it to be Whole30. 

Option three is jumping into Whole30 fairly quickly -- pick some Whole30 recipes that sound good, even if they don't sound like what you're used to, make your grocery list, and just go for it. 

For either option two or three, here are some Whole30 resources that might be helpful: 

All the official Whole30 books and books with the Whole30 endorsement. You may be able to find these at your local library or at used book stores, or even check with friends and see if anyone has any you could borrow -- I am definitely not telling you to go buy any or all of them. You can do a Whole30 without buying any of them, but sometimes people like to have a physical book to look at, and if you just go to Amazon and search Whole30 you get a bunch of stuff that isn't necessarily legit. This is just the official list.

Mel Joulwan's Whole30 recipes -- I love looking at this site. Just seeing the pictures and reading her descriptions make me want to cook things. She does have non-Whole30 recipes as well, just double check the ingredients if you decide to make any of the recipes.

Whole30 Pinterest account -- has a ton of Whole30 recipes, tips, success stories, etc.

Whole30 recipes

Whole30 Recipes Instagram account -- different food bloggers take over the feed each week, so there's a variety of recipes. Sometimes there are process videos as well, which can be helpful to see how they do things.

I hope some of this has been useful. I'm just not really sure what would be the most helpful for you. 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 11/16/2022 at 7:26 AM, ShannonM816 said:

I've been trying to think of a good option for you. Honestly, it's hard to recommend one cookbook that's going to have exactly what you're looking for, especially if you want it to also be Whole30 compatible. 

I think you could go about this one of three ways, and none of them are right or wrong, you're going to have to decide what will work best for you.

Option one could be expensive, and may not be an option outside of the US, but limits how much cooking you do -- find meal services, pre-made meals, or restaurants in your area that offer Whole30 compatible options. There are links to some Here -- you can filter it so you just see Restaurants and Meal Delivery, and then by state. 

Option two is kind of ramping up to Whole30 by learning some basic recipes and cooking techniques, while not committing to a full Whole30 just yet. This could mean trying one or two Whole30 recipes each week, or it could mean finding your perfect version of tuna salad or meatloaf and then figuring out what it is you like about it so you can figure out how to change it to be Whole30. 

Option three is jumping into Whole30 fairly quickly -- pick some Whole30 recipes that sound good, even if they don't sound like what you're used to, make your grocery list, and just go for it. 

For either option two or three, here are some Whole30 resources that might be helpful: 

All the official Whole30 books and books with the Whole30 endorsement. You may be able to find these at your local library or at used book stores, or even check with friends and see if anyone has any you could borrow -- I am definitely not telling you to go buy any or all of them. You can do a Whole30 without buying any of them, but sometimes people like to have a physical book to look at, and if you just go to Amazon and search Whole30 you get a bunch of stuff that isn't necessarily legit. This is just the official list.

Mel Joulwan's Whole30 recipes -- I love looking at this site. Just seeing the pictures and reading her descriptions make me want to cook things. She does have non-Whole30 recipes as well, just double check the ingredients if you decide to make any of the recipes.

Whole30 Pinterest account -- has a ton of Whole30 recipes, tips, success stories, etc.

Whole30 recipes

Whole30 Recipes Instagram account -- different food bloggers take over the feed each week, so there's a variety of recipes. Sometimes there are process videos as well, which can be helpful to see how they do things.

I hope some of this has been useful. I'm just not really sure what would be the most helpful for you. 

 

I was wondering here and there. Then , i saw your post. I'm new here and also finding the topics related to my interest. It looks informative. 

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