I just won a $1,000 bet, thanks to Whole30


Joe

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All:

My wife, who is about 10-times healthier than I am when it comes to eating healthy, was talking about this diet back in December. She had tested it out --and more importantly, studied up on 'why' it's a good initiative-- and dared (?) me to do it. More like bet me: $1,000. I survived.

I know that's a little juvenile to have money serve as a motivator for a diet like this. However, at around day 14, I began to realize that it wasn't about the money. "Eating healthy" wasn't all that bad. Reading labels became interesting...and kind of fun. I enjoyed the challenge. And I couldn't help looking at other people's shopping carts ("you're seriously going to drink all of that Mountain Dew?")-- during every shopping visit. And I don't mean that in a mocking way, it's almost second nature when you're a part of a diet like this.

I applaud the people of Whole30 for this diet...and those that have gone through this and continue to make it their permanent lifestyle. The diet is great because it involves no wiggle room. You CAN'T eat sugar. You CAN'T eat processed foods. You CAN'T eat junk food. You CAN'T cheat. I really like that. It's black and white. Why can't all diets be like this? I think the problem with most diets in America is that people (so easily) fall off the wagon--- "Oh, I was good for the last 3 meals. I am going to 'reward' myself with a Big Mac and fries. Psssh.

I have some pros and cons to this diet, though:

Pros: I never had any 'cravings' for sugar or non-Whole30 diet foods. Not once. I'm not sure if that's just because of my makeup or because the diet did a certain amount of cleansing that it took all cravings out of the equation. I also enjoyed the cooking/preparing of food. Like I said, reading labels was fun....and a little eye-opening. My average meals would be 'guacamole/tomato' omelets and grapefruit (breakfast), beef stir fry--with peppers, tomatoes and onions-- for lunch, and then a chicken salad/kale salad, pork chop, applesauce....etc for dinner. I spiked each meal with pineapple/oranges/kiwis/mangos/macadamia nuts/pistachios as needed. I also lost 15 points...although I never made that a priority.

Cons: This diet is a drain financially. Let's face it, going to Trader Joe's and Whole Foods adds up. I know you can probably 'get by' with going to a regular grocery store...but the book really recommends the highest-quality meat and whatnot (no hormones...etc). That costs money. Would this diet work for lower-income people? I'm indecisive.

Bottom line: great job, Whole 30. I "get it" now, you know? I love the plan. I think I understand my wife more and --certainly-- her respect for eating healthy food and treating her body right.

My first meal off the diet was a Jimmy John's sub. Not that I just HAD to have it or anything-- it's because it was the only thing left in the fridge. Have to say, it was bittersweet to eat that sandwich.

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One more thing....

I truly applaud everyone that attempts (and completes) this diet. It's not easy...but it is kind of fun! One more recommendation for everyone: I think that January is a good month to do this. Let's face it, who wants to eat more sweets/junk food after the holidays?

Thanks again to all.

Joe

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Cons: This diet is a drain financially. Let's face it, going to Trader Joe's and Whole Foods adds up. I know you can probably 'get by' with going to a regular grocery store...but the book really recommends the highest-quality meat and whatnot (no hormones...etc). That costs money. Would this diet work for lower-income people? I'm indecisive.

Does it work for lower-income people. The short answer is 'yes'. I'm living proof :). There's no doubt that the better quality meat you can afford, the healthier it is, better for the farmers etc. but that's never been a stipulation of W30. I'm recently retired, living on basic state pension plus a little extra for caring for my son. Finances are limited, so I prioritise. Firstly I prioritise food over other things. Then I break that down. I go to the farmer's market once every 2 weeks usually. I get fattier, cheaper cuts of meat from a farmer I trust. Leaner meats come from the regular store. I stock up on special offers etc. I get a delivery of veg once a week from a local organic nursery which is a bit of an indulgence but I enjoy it and budget for it. Most other veg is the cheapest I can find :). I use a lot of eggs as they're reasonably priced and I stock up on tins of sardines and tuna when they're on offer.

I've adopted this as a lifestyle choice not just for 30 days. I'd really hate to see anyone put off because of the cost because it can be done on a budget. Congrats on your 30 days.

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Grats! You can live this way for the rest of your life on a budget. I prioritize what's more important to us when it comes to what I should be buying pastured/grass-fed and organics. I only buy pastured/grass-fed ground beef, pork and eggs(for mayo only), organic eggs for daily consumption, organic greens and everything else is conventional unless I can find a good sale. You do what you can, but to me one of the most important things is no processed crap and very rarely eating out. You save quite a bit on not buying the junk. I hope you keep going as I feel it's worthwhile. :)

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Great post and I'm glad it worked for you!

My whole attitude to the way I eat has changed but I don't feel my sugar dragon has been dealt with effectively yet, so I am going to keep going. I also want to continue eating this way as I enjoy the foods I am eating and have discovered all these new and interesting vegetables I never used to consider buying.

I am not sure I have noticed a difference financially, I have not calculated it exactly, but I used to snack a lot and eat a bigger variety of foodstuffs (or things disguised as food) than what I do now, so when I shop I am limiting it to basic whole ingredients. Definitely makes the shopping easier and probably cheaper to be honest. If I am in the supermarket in the early evening, they have a reduced section where I can get cheaper meat and put it in the freezer. My husband and daughter have not been cutting out grains, dairy etc during my Whole30 so I have been buying extra protein and veg for myself and all the other food for them aswell, like oatcakes, pasta, bread, yoghurt, cheese......I think it has all evened out.

So did you end up spending your $1000 on food then? ;)

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