Jump to content

Plantar Faciitis and Rotator Cuff Tendonitis


Jenn B

Recommended Posts

Veinly, I admit I started the Whole30 to get rid of my gut (2 kids later, years of working out, triathlons... every trainer/instructor I have ever come across has commented losing the gut is not about working out, but what I put in my mouth.

However, as I read the book and re read about foods, I am more intrigued with ridding my body of plantar faciitis that's been plaguing me since June 2012, and a annually recurring bout with tendonitis in my rotator cuff that I am now in physical therapy for.

After mutlple injections of cortisone, naproxen, staying off it, icing with a frozen water bottle, sleeping with the night cast on... I am looking at laser surgery. With all the testimonials, it seems like this (whole30 and beyond) might do the trick. I am completing day 8 and have chose to no longer taking anti nflammatories. Not because I am pain free, because I want to be aware of the pain. I am falling into that category of impatient. I recall people saying they started to notice around day12 a difference in their inflammation pain, as in 2 weeks seems to be a turning point. Is this really the case?

I thought maybe nuts were the culprit and first removed almonds and switched to macademia and cashew, limiting them to 1x per day. Now I am 2 days with complete elimination of nuts.

I am committed to 100% of this eating regime, I am sorely frustrated by not being to workout to the magnitude I am accustom to.

Can anyone who this has helped Plantar Faciitis/other joint tendonitis comment...

Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

I've had problems with my left elbow more or less continuously for the past 4 or 5 years. Tendonitis is one description doctors and physical therapists have used. I have eaten a Whole30 diet for almost 3 years and still have problems with my left elbow. You might experience some relief from eating the Whole30 way, but I would not bank on it, especially if you are old enough to have two kids, years of working out, etc. under your belt. Some people do have amazing recoveries, but that has not been my experience.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry to hear it hasn't gotten better for you Tom. There is some hope, though! I had a horrible bout with Plantar Faciitis a few years ago, and, fingers crossed, I haven't had trouble in quite some time. I don't think it had much to do with diet, but stretching/yoga (downward dog was excruciating for a while but slowly this helped), working on building up strength in my feet and arches, and shoes: first super supportive new cushy shoes, then, later, minimalist shoes. oh and not running anymore :P . sprinting and agility, yes (with lots of work on technique so I'm no striking my heal or my mid-foot), but never ever long-distance running.

I just want to say it is possible to recover. And do the whole30 regardless, there is so much good here, even if it doesn't fix your feet!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It took me a year for my PF to heal completely.

Of course, it was a year at least ( :blink: !) for me, too, and maybe another year or more before I was sprinting regularly, but it did eventually get better. there is hope but patience is required as well. enjoy biking and swimming in the meantime.

good luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm dealing with shoulder issues too, but not tendonitis. My ligaments in both of my shoulders are too stretchy and I had surgery on one of them back in college. Five years later, the other one started acting up (lots of subluxations, holding anything that weighs a pound or more in that hand and relaxing my muscles causes the shoulder to dip out of the socket, can't run because the impact causes it to dip out of the socket, ellipticals even have too much of an impact, plus there's nowhere to put my arm that's comfortable) and I've been in physical therapy since October (original major sublux was in June, but I had to redeploy, and I had leave, etc.). I have a referral (that my physical therapist put in!) to see an orthopedic surgeon at the end of the month that was put in after I had started the Whole 30. I'm probably going to need surgery.

I realize that this isn't the same necessarily as your tendonitis, but don't expect this to necessarily fix it. Physical therapy takes a while to help, so don't stop that, and give yourself a break. If it does help, that's awesome, since it has helped the IT band syndrome that kept popping up every time I would bike for more than twenty minutes to half an hour...that stopped almost immediately after I started the Whole 30, and I was on the spin bike for 45 minutes yesterday evening!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have been having persistent issues with tendonitis as well. None of the conventional therapies worked very well and I was pretty much at the end of my rope so when a friend suggested acupuncture skeptical but decided to give it a try.

It didn't work overnight but I did see gradual improvement. Combining the acupuncture with stretching and as much rest as possible made a huge difference and now I'm completely free of tendonitis. The acupuncture also completely relieved my hot flashes, which I hadn't even mentioned to the acupuncturist.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've had plantars fasciitis for over 5 years. The pain greatly diminishes at about two weeks into a whole 30. I also think bone broth really helps. The pain comes back as my eating gets worse. Especially with too much wheat and sugar. The pain is still not as bad as it used to be.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...