Discovered ghee!


gattling

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So, I'm on Day 13 of my W30 experience, and I have to admit, one area which I did not manage well was the home-preparation of specific Paleo-friendly condiments and essential ingredients. For example, I still plan to make a batch of my own Paleo-mayonnaise, but just haven't gotten around to it yet. Likewise, I also haven't made my own ghee. I know it's easy, but it's just not something I've had the motivation to tackle.

Looking at my new favorite Paleo-recipe website, nomnompaleo.com, I noticed that you can also purchase ghee either through the mail or at a variety of Indian grocery stores. Well, earlier this afternoon at the Kimberton Whole Foods in Downingtown PA (a separate chain from your usual Whole Foods), I discovered the exact brand that Michelle recommends on her site: Pure Indian Foods' organic grass-fed ghee. Delighted, I picked up a jar.

Tonight, I used it in Melissa Joulwan's chocolate chili. Fantastic!!! For some reason, coconut oil has not been agreeing with me, but this ghee hit the spot. Looking forward to trying this in future cooking endeavors!

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i made some last night... it was easy and AMAZING... reminds me of brown butter frosting... dipped boiled crab legs in it tonight for dinner... i found the directions here in the W9 forum.... http://justhomemade.net/2010/10/27/homemade-ghee/ has great pictures and directions... i wasn't sure if i was to be stirring it... so i didn't and it still turned out wonderfully!

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Welcome to the "Ghee Club!"

I learned about Ghee (or clarified butter) in my first cooking class about 10 years ago as a preferred fat for sautéing because of its high smoke point (about 250 deg). Been making it ever since.

Fun facts: "ghee" is a sanskrit word and has been used for around 5,000 years, mainly in cooking but also in auyervedic medicine. It can be made from several types of milk/butter (even human breast milk) is a pretty sacred substance in India, where it's used in almost everything. It's even reportedly against the law for a restaurant to use cheaper substitutes, called vanaspati, which is made from vegetable oil and often contains trans fats.

I use a gravy separator and a paper towel to make a batch about once a week. Once you've made some ghee and seen all those nasty milk solids turning brown and separating out, it's hard to go back to real butter.

I know sometimes in Indian cooking ghee is flavored with various spices, so that's the next experiment. I'm thinking a batch of garlic/rosemary ghee might be nice to have available for special occasions.

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I have a quick question re: making ghee.

So far I've made two batches. The first one, I babysat like crazy, following the step by step picture provided by Nom Nom Paleo and it came out the bright yellow color seen in the pictures.

The second batch, I was a little more relaxed about, may even have wandered off - and it came out as described by art cabana jojo above - browned, almost seemed caramelized and sweet. Smells amazing and delicious - which makes me think I did it wrong?

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@Sharon. LOL! If that's the worst food felony you commit...

You and lots of other "foodies" use milk solids in a variety of dishes from sprinkling on vegetables to sweet, Indian desserts. A lot of chefs and restaurants save them for pasta finishes, etc.

From a post-W30 perspective, I guess it just depends on how you plan to re-introduce dairy into your eating equation.

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Oh I have no issues with dairy and I always buy organic/pastured when it comes to dairy. I rarely have it though, even post Whole30. I like a little sour cream in my chili or sometimes I buy Dubliner cheese but that's about it.

I promised to save the milk solids for my hubs cause he wants to try them, I kept about a tablespoon and tossed the rest.

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Oh I have no issues with dairy and I always buy organic/pastured when it comes to dairy. I rarely have it though, even post Whole30. I like a little sour cream in my chili or sometimes I buy Dubliner cheese but that's about it.

I promised to save the milk solids for my hubs cause he wants to try them, I kept about a tablespoon and tossed the rest.

Lol Sharon. Remember Nancy? The first time she made ghee, she was very pleased. She went on to rave about "these browned bits" being so good on something. I think she sprinkled them on her green beans. :0)

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  • 3 months later...
So, I'm on Day 13 of my W30 experience, and I have to admit, one area which I did not manage well was the home-preparation of specific Paleo-friendly condiments and essential ingredients. For example, I still plan to make a batch of my own Paleo-mayonnaise, but just haven't gotten around to it yet. Likewise, I also haven't made my own ghee. I know it's easy, but it's just not something I've had the motivation to tackle.

Looking at my new favorite Paleo-recipe website, nomnompaleo.com, I noticed that you can also purchase ghee either through the mail or at a variety of Indian grocery stores. Well, earlier this afternoon at the Kimberton Whole Foods in Downingtown PA (a separate chain from your usual Whole Foods), I discovered the exact brand that Michelle recommends on her site: Pure Indian Foods' organic grass-fed ghee. Delighted, I picked up a jar.

Tonight, I used it in Melissa Joulwan's chocolate chili. Fantastic!!! For some reason, coconut oil has not been agreeing with me, but this ghee hit the spot. Looking forward to trying this in future cooking endeavors!

I'm a newbie and had never heard of ghee until reading it starts with food...just ordered ghee from amazon...sme brand...arrives tomorrow...getting ready for my whole30 june 1

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  • 1 year later...

Reviving an old topic only because I found ghee in the Indian grocery store near my office - however, nothing at this store is labeled 'grass-fed' or 'organic' and all appears to be imported. I'm wondering if anybody has any particular knowledge about Indian brands of ghee and which ones would be the best? If any? Seems to be cheaper there than at whole foods or the Pure Indian Foods brand.

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Seems to be cheaper there than at whole foods or the Pure Indian Foods brand.

 

You get what you pay for. Organic milk from grass-fed cows will make better ghee (both taste and nutrition). That said, the whole30 does not limit you to specific types of ghee. You are free to test out various brands and see what you like.

 

I've found making my own to be significantly less expensive, and not much work at all, just don't get confused by some of the posts in this thread: the "browned bits" are the milk solids that must be strained and discarded. The whole point of ghee from a whole30 perspective is to remove those bits which may be gut disruptors.

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An ayurved that I worked with always cautioned against the cheap jars of "ghee" found in Indian grocers. She said they weren't real ghee and are terrible for you.

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  • 1 month later...

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