Is "Light" Olive Oil healthy? I want to make mayo.


JaneA

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I just downloaded the Kindle version of ISWF. We're starting the Whole30 next weekend, when I can go to the grocery store. My question is regarding the mayo. I've made homemade mayo before, but I used EVOO. Of course, my family hated it since they're used to Hellman's. I was excited to see the "Light" flavor oil. Then, I did a little research. What I found is that the light oil has solvents and deoderizers along with the oil from the leftovers when they made the EVOO (pomace oil). I'm a bit hesitant to use something with solvents and deoderizers. Has this been addressed anywhere? What do you guys think about it? I also made the mayo with refined coconut oil (which is pretty tasteless), but they didn't like that, either. I can't spend a ton of money on macedamia nut or avocado oils if I don't know what the results in the mayo will be.

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The oil I use for mayo is Berio's Mild & Light. I agree that EVOO is the better oil but this is made from 'refined olive oils' and 'virgin olive oils.

I found this on the web

According to the International Olive Oil Council, refined olive oil is the olive oil obtained from virgin olive oils by refining methods that do not lead to alterations in the initial glyceridic structure. It has a free acidity, expressed as oleic acid, of no more than 0.3 grams per 100 grams (0.3%) and its other characteristics correspond to those fixed for this category in the IOOC standards.

This oil is obtained by refining virgin olive oils (not olive-pomace oils) that have a high acidity level and/or organoleptic defects that are eliminated after refining. Over 50% of the oil produced in the Mediterranean area is of such poor quality that it must be refined to produce an edible product. Note that no solvents have been used to extract the oil, but it has been refined with the use of charcoal and other chemical and physical filters.

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I make my mayo with Bertolli's Extra light tasting olive oil. EVOO will definitely give it that heavy olive-y taste which is much too heavy for mayo. I have also tried Avocado oil mayo and wasn't a fan. (maybe it has to do with me not being a fan of avocadoes - a shame, I know)

My best result mayo is (if you are looking for Hellman's type) is if you do 1 tbst of lemon and 1 tbsp of ACV. It comes out a little more tangy and less lemony. If you can mix some spices in it ie: italian seasoning, and black pepper it tastes even nicer.

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Hmmmmm.. EVOO is from the first pressing, pomace is repressed and crushed to extract any leftover and is usually quite harsh and very earthy/muddy tasting

Fall harvest EVOO is usually the earthy,green delicious oil we are used to

Spring harvest EVOO is yellow and buttery " lighter " in taste.... So different olives, different harvest, same process

I'm sure the article you read was referring to cheep supermarket brands of Hugh commercially processed brands....

Pretty sure if you found a small boutique processor their spring harvest would be untouched by additives.....

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The oil I use for mayo is Berio's Mild & Light. I agree that EVOO is the better oil but this is made from 'refined olive oils' and 'virgin olive oils.

I found this on the web

According to the International Olive Oil Council, refined olive oil is the olive oil obtained from virgin olive oils by refining methods that do not lead to alterations in the initial glyceridic structure. It has a free acidity, expressed as oleic acid, of no more than 0.3 grams per 100 grams (0.3%) and its other characteristics correspond to those fixed for this category in the IOOC standards.

This oil is obtained by refining virgin olive oils (not olive-pomace oils) that have a high acidity level and/or organoleptic defects that are eliminated after refining. Over 50% of the oil produced in the Mediterranean area is of such poor quality that it must be refined to produce an edible product. Note that no solvents have been used to extract the oil, but it has been refined with the use of charcoal and other chemical and physical filters.

Great stuff to know!! Thanks Kristeen

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Everything I've read about the light olive oil either doesn't mention how it's refined or says solvents and deoderizers are used. I don't know that I can afford boutique olive oil. We have a boutique in town and one small bottle is around $15. I don't mind trying Bertolli (I've never seen Berio's). I"ll just say a little prayer that I'm not adding a bunch of chemicals (thereby, defeating the purpose of making my own mayo). Thanks, guys, for the responses!

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  • 2 months later...
Guest Andria

Wanted to see if I could revive this topic....my question in regards to "is it healthy" is whether it is 100% olive oil. I have quickly pursued the Internet and seen many articles on fake olive oils. These articles seem to be discussing EVOO, mostly. BuT I am concerned about light olive oil. As most know, mayo made with EVOO doesn't taste great and I just made perfect mayo with a light olive oil (Bertoli's) as a lot of paleo recipes suggest. Now, of course after I made this perfect mayo, I am worried that I may have a blend of olive oil with corn or soybean oil....blech!

Apparently, the FDA allows blending of oils, to some extent, and labeling as olive oil (even exta virgin). A study at UC Davis (http://articles.latimes.com/2011/apr/14/news/la-olive-oil-20110414) showed many brands were not pure olive oil.

I did not like mayo made with avocado oil *sad face* and Whole Foods is not carrying macadamia nut oil anymore *mad face*.

Wondered if anyone could weigh in on the topic and whether I should keep eating this mayo (moderators input greatly appreciated!)

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Personally, I do the best with the information I have available and let go of the rest. Since I can't tell whether my light oil is mislabeled, and I don't have allergies to the other oils, I use it in good faith and get on with my life.

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Also A really good test to find out if Olive Oil is fake or not (even light tasting) is if it freezes in your refridgerator or not. If it becomes a solid within 24 - 48 hours it's the real thing. If it contains other cheaper oils - it will not freeze. I found that even Bertollis Extra Light tasting froze. So to me it's good.

But yes. You do the best with the information that you have.

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I agree with the others, we all just have to do the best we can. For instance I buy veg from a local organic nursery but I'm not in a position to personally go there to check it out, and if I order grass fed meat online, I'm trusting that's what it is. It's the same with olive oil, I buy the most reputable brands I can find and trust it is what it says it is. I can't find Bertolli extra light anywhere over here but loads of people in the US have reported using it without any problems whatsoever and Carlaccin's test would seem to indicate it's the real deal.

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Guest Andria

Thanks guys...erm, gals! Yes, I get the "do your best with what you know".....but with currently doing a Whole30 and eating large clumps of mayo daily I feel it's pretty important to know if I am getting doused with soybean or corn oil (pretty important to rule out). Any other time I may not be too worried over it (although I would prefer to steer far far away from those two particular ingredients!). And considering the information IS out there I thought, maybe, I could get out of doing my own research and see if someone else may have done some research of their own! Ha ha...

Oh well, I plan to read more, esp the UC Davis information, and decided for myself. As well as using Carlaccini's suggestion to refrigerate it ( that probably being the easier assessment!)

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