Received Dr. note for food intolerances. Yay!


Moluv

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Thanks to the posters and moderators (especially Robin) in the kids forum, I took the advice to get a Dr. note when my little one went in for his annual visit today. My kids go to a health clinic run by the WTAMU nurse practitioner school and as consumers of self-pay medical services we have always found NP's more accessible and flexible than MD's. Even so I was a little nervous to ask because I expected some kind of difference of opinion to ensue, and I felt a little underprepared to defend myself. But, the NP was right on board with it and even commended me for it. I feel validated in making this choice for my kids. The note states intolerances to all grains, dairy and sugar and instructs no foods containing them shall be given.

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She was going through a whole family history questionnaire and when she asked about "allergies" I said "my husband has seasonal allergies as well as we both have numerous food intolerances, though we have not been tested. I'd like to find out about getting a dr note for the kids so they don't eat those things at school" and she just said "oh yeah, absolutely I can do that" and then later asked me about which foods and what reactions they gave and how severe the reactions were. Symptoms including, aggression, bloating, stomach ache, and constipation ranging from moderate to severe (maybe I was overstating that a bit).

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That is awesome Moluv, well done. I m considering a trip to our Dr too. I am being referred to a dietician at the moment!

If I remember correctly, you're in the UK? I've been referred to a dietician previoulsy and also used to have a friend who was one. I hate to have to say this but, unfortunately, because they work for the NHS they can do nothing but push the food pyramid :( lots of grains, 5-a-day, watch the amount of red meat, cut out saturated fat etc :angry: Very few of them have any truck with food intolerances unless it's a positive cealiac test and even then their advice is to eat plenty of gluten free grains and gluten free frankenfood. I ended up being less than truthful and just saying I ate a 'sort of mediteranean diet' to shut them up and stop them reporting back to my doc thatI was causing my own problems through my *unhealthy* diet.

My friend ended up giving up her job because she was breaking her heart at the advice she had to give parents on how to feed their diabetic children when it went against everything she believed. I've also known a few parents who ran into the 'why are you feeding your child such an unhealthy diet, don't you realise you're endangering their health' scenario. I'm afraid the NHS seems to be stuck in the dark ages nutritionally.

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If I remember correctly, you're in the UK? I've been referred to a dietician previoulsy and also used to have a friend who was one. I hate to have to say this but, unfortunately, because they work for the NHS they can do nothing but push the food pyramid :( lots of grains, 5-a-day, watch the amount of red meat, cut out saturated fat etc :angry: Very few of them have any truck with food intolerances unless it's a positive cealiac test and even then their advice is to eat plenty of gluten free grains and gluten free frankenfood. I ended up being less than truthful and just saying I ate a 'sort of mediteranean diet' to shut them up and stop them reporting back to my doc thatI was causing my own problems through my *unhealthy* diet.

My friend ended up giving up her job because she was breaking her heart at the advice she had to give parents on how to feed their diabetic children when it went against everything she believed. I've also known a few parents who ran into the 'why are you feeding your child such an unhealthy diet, don't you realise you're endangering their health' scenario. I'm afraid the NHS seems to be stuck in the dark ages nutritionally.

Little muffin- I asked you on another post if your daughters school was on a subsidized government program- I'm in the US so that's all I could think to call it- but what Kirsteen just described is the UK equivalent. It's the healthcare system that the school is in concert with. I see more clearly now what you are dealing with.

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It is pants and I am dreading it. The health visitor sold it to me as "just to make sure she's etting what she needs". My question would be "who decides what she needs?"

Both my girls are doing really well on this 'diet' ad it's really starting to annoy me when I am being questioned and analysed all the time.

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