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My friend is doing her first Whole30 with me as I do my second.... We're on day 5 and she feels nauseous every time she eats. Could this have something to do with the fact she has haemochromatosis (high levels of iron in the blood)?

Anybody have answers for Kate? Would really appreciate some input! :rolleyes:

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I am going to come at this from a very non sciency non medical viewpoint. Is this a new feeling for her? Is she eating different foods than she normally does?

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She does have a bit of a sensitive tummy (eg throwing up after she drank a green smoothie). Her diet would normally include all the usual carbs, of course, but otherwise she eats pretty healthily.

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Hmmm..so the green smoothie contained raw veggies right? Sorry but I have never had one. So my original question still stands. What is she eating now that she didn't use to eat?

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She normally cooks with olive oil and eats avocado, but not nearly as much fat as she's having now. I suggested she cut her amounts in half which helped a bit with the nausea this morning.

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Yeah, know the fat's important - it was just an experiment to see if it was that causing the problem....

Thanks very much for your input, I'm hoping a moderator can help, too. Kate's too shy to write on the forum herself! :(

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Haemochromatosis can damage your organs, so (without putting words into anyone's mouth) I was wondering if perhaps her liver was having trouble processing that amount of fat.

We were hoping someone else who's done the W30 has had the same complaint and wonder how they've fared while on it.

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I wouldn't be so quick to diagnose Haemochromatosis. Lots of people experience nausea when first starting the whole30, and I think it has more to do with getting used to the balance of protein, carbs and fat in the plan. Adding digestive enzymes may help with the protein and fat component. Changing to coconut oil from olive oil can also help (coconut oil doesn't oxidize when heated, which is good, but in this case even better to know it is not processed in the liver).

Finally: skip the green smoothie (we eat solid food), and drink a lot of water. Tom has a couple glasses right away in the morning. I think that might be a good idea for your friend.

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I wouldn't be so quick to diagnose Haemochromatosis.

From my reading of the post, Kate actually has haemochromatosis (already diagnosed) and kitchenwhizz is wondering if this may have anything to do with the nausea her friend is experiencing.

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From my reading of the post, Kate actually has haemochromatosis (already diagnosed) and kitchenwhizz is wondering if this may have anything to do with the nausea her friend is experiencing.

oOOH, sorry, I guess I missed that part. From my brief googling, it doesn't look like the two are related, so I stand by my suggestions.

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Summergirl is correct - Kate's haemochromatosis was diagnosed by her doctor. Her father's liver has been damaged by the same complaint so she's assuming the same thing has happened to her.....

Thanks for the tips, missmary. Kate always drinks lots of water and she only tried green smoothies with her last 'health kick', not the W30. It was good to read that lots of others experience nausea, I didn't realise that because I didn't feel it at all. The digestive enzymes might help though, I'll pass that on.

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I would say it's just adaptation. Back in the day when I did my very first Whole30, I know that there were days and meals where I just felt gross eating all the fat. Especially after five days which is when many people start experiencing all the nasty withdrawal stuff. Or maybe it wasn't really even the fat, it was just my body getting used to something different or my intestinal flora readjusting. For whatever reason I can remember looking at meals that I now love and eat every day, and feeling a little queasy, early on.

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Thanks for your comments, everyone who replied to my post, but Kate gave up the W30 on Friday. :( The nausea was too debilitating for her.

I, however, am soldiering on with my 2nd....and having a lot more difficulty with cravings this time round!

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kitchenwhizz - I actually have the opposite problem to your friend (secondary iron deficient anaemia!), so my advice comes from the opposite of recommendations given to me. Get rid of the green smoothies! I know, they're awesome, they taste good and they help with digestive issues (I find especially at the far end of the disgestive track, if you follow...), BUT leafy greens which make up a nice chunk of your smoothie are high in iron, and with the exception of spinach, the iron stores are readily usable by the body. Its why I make sure I get lots of leafy greens, but it might be contributing to raising your friend's iron levels even more, and I can only imagine (literally, I have never had high iron levels!) what that'd be doing to her.

I hope she's feeling better.

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kitchenwizz, Chris Kresser has a lot to say about hemochromatosis on his blog (www.chriskresser.com), but the condition can definitely be a little problematic with the increased amounts of iron that she's probably consuming now. How is she managing her iron levels? Is she getting transfusions regularly, and is that enough to manage it?

You can either a) avoid the foods high in iron or B) eat a few types of food that BIND with iron, and then you won't absorb it. There's heme iron (found in animals) and non-heme iron (found in plants).

There are foods that bind to one and not the other, (chocolate, for example, only binds to non-heme iron, i believe), and there are some supplements that bind to both.

SOOOOO, have her check in with her doc and mention her increase in iron intake and see how the doc wants her to handle it. (hint: going back to grains isn't necessary) :)

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I also have been diagnosed by my doctor with hemochromotosis.  Anyone else have any experiences doing a W30 with my condition?  So far I am eating low iron foods to try to keep my ferretin level down.

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