manley0702

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  1. home made jerky

    Soy sauce is tough to replace. In the official "can-i-have" guide, they suggest using coconut aminos. The guide even says, "tastes just like soy sauce". Imo, it doesn't taste anything like soy sauce. It's far sweeter and less umame. I mix coconut aminos and red boat fish sauce at about a 1:1 ratio to recreate soy sauce. It's not exactly the same, but it's as close as I've discovered.
  2. USA Today saying....Coconut Oil now bad for you!?!?!??

    I can't find the actual study that's referenced, but here are some thoughts: 1. The American Heart Association is about the worst organization out there for health advice. They recommend <6% of your diet be made up of saturated fats. That's simply asinine. Historically, there are healthy groups of people that get up to 70% of their diet from saturated fat. I wouldn't shoot for 70% myself, but eating 20%-30% of your diet from saturated fat is historically something that many groups of people have done and have been very healthy. 2. They claim coconut oil, like other saturated fats, raises LDL levels. So what? LDL isn't "bad" cholesterol like everyone claims. There are two types of LDL cholesterol: type A and type B. Type A is actually good for you; Type B is bad. Saturated fat raises Type A, not type B. Furthermore, saturated fat raises HDL along with LDL so your profile actually improves since total cholesterol is basically irrelevant and ratio of HDL:LDL is a better indicator. It blows my mind that people don't get this. You know who has really low LDL levels? Alcoholics, and (shocker) that's not a good thing. Your body needs LDL to perform basic functions.
  3. Sweet potato -- any qualifications?

    What kind of rule is that? You're adults. They shouldn't be telling you whether or not you're "allowed" to bring outside food. Regardless, if I were you, I'd order some Epic bars and stash them in your purse just in case they don't have any compliant food.
  4. Pre and Post Workout Meal Planning

    I never argued that eating egg whites isn't whole30 compliant. I simply gave my opinion as to why I think it's less than optimal, even for PWO. For the record, I also think that eating Larabars and drinking compliant almond milk is less than optimal while it's still Whole 30 compliant. Eating shrimp or steak.
  5. Pre and Post Workout Meal Planning

    Personally, I wouldn't eat egg whites. Is it Whole30 compliant? Sure, but in my opinion, it goes against the spirit of a paleo diet (whole30 or any other version). Ancestral eating is based on eating whole, real foods. Eating egg whites without the rest of the egg isn't natural, and it's only something humans have been doing for 40-50 years. It's far too similar to low fat milk in that you're removing a natural part of the food and creating a new, hybrid food that just doesn't feel real.
  6. how much fat?

    Personally, if I were worried about fat loss, dietary fat would be the least of my worries. As it pertains to fat storage, carbs are easiest to store, protein can store if eaten in excess (by way of gluconeogenesis), and dietary fat is the most difficult to store. In other words, if you're going to go overboard on any of the macros, go overboard on fat. With that said, if you're eating healthy and 15+ lbs. overweight, you'll lose body fat regardless of your macros.
  7. 100% Peanuts

    I know the general rule is that if you eat something not compliant, you should start over. With that said, I can't imagine one peanut would merit starting over. I mean, one ounce of soy or sugary drink? yes, start over. One peanut? Imo, no.
  8. This Problem of SWYPO (or How My Whole30 Star Fell)

    "I have been unwittingly breaking a rule of the program" - That's why you should read before you jump into the program. I feel bad for people who accidentally eat something because it had one obscure ingredient that they happened to miss. I can't make myself feel sorry for someone who missed one of the biggest, most obvious rules of the program. Obscure ingredients are tough to memorize; eating paleo-fied foods is something you'd have known if you only read about the program for 10 minutes. It's on par with someone who messes up for eating soy or rice. "I have truly enjoyed eating paleo tortillas, and I would submit that depriving myself of these would have a more negative longer-term impact than including them in my Whole30 diet" - There's absolutely nothing wrong with that. Just keep eating that way and tell folks you're on a strict paleo diet. Strict paleo diets are good, perhaps just as good as Whole30. It's a different diet though. "If this program is truly about health and healthy living, then wouldn’t it make sense to try to create sustainable habits?" - This diet isn't intended to be something you do for your entire life. It's an elimination diet. Adding in paleo-fied tortillas would be a logical first step in your induction phase. "Larabars" - I'm with you on this one. With healthier alternatives for protein bars out there, I can't imagine why Larabars are still allowed. " I now genuinely crave paleo tortillas and could be happy eating this healthy alternative for the rest of my life, instead of just going back to corn tortillas in a week." - That's wonderful. Again, you're doing a strict paleo diet, and you're thriving. Be happy about that. I don't know why you're so upset.
  9. Stevia

    1. People stress things like "glycemic load", but that's pretty irrelevant for the purposes of Whole30. I mean, practically if you're trying to lose weight, you should limit your sugars, but that's not a Whole30 concept. That's a concept you structure your Whole30 around.Both honey and stevia are used specifically for sweetening food that isn't naturally sweet so they're treated equally. 2. I actually agree with you on the fruit juice though the Hartwigs seem to admit that fruit juice as a sweetener is more of the exception than the rule. In other words, they're throwing you a bone with that. Instead of asking for more bones, just be happy they gave you something Personally, I don't use fruit juice as a sweetener (except that I drink LaCroix) because it feels like cheating to me.
  10. COCONUT CREAM

    This is false. Apples have sugar; sweet potatoes have sugar; plantains have sugar. Those are all Whole30 approved. Whole30 isn't a "no sugar" diet. It's a natural foods/strict paleo diet. As others have stated, sugar is perfectly fine if it occurs naturally in the food. Coconut contains sugar naturally so as long as they're not adding additional sugar, it's good for Whole30.
  11. Not a fan of meat

    I'm not a fan of veggies, but I know they're good for me and a staple of Whole30 so I eat a ton of them anyways. I still get tons of meat and other food that I like so I don't dread meals. If I were you, I'd try to treat meat the same way I do veggies. In the end, it's darn near impossible to live a healthy lifestyle without eating meat.
  12. Starting Jan 30th! Pesto and mustard?

    Always read the ingredients, but it looks like both Heinz and French's yellow mustard is compliant.
  13. New Lara Bars

    From all I read on this forum, the consensus seems to be that Lara bars are the least compliant of all compliant foods. It seems to me that Lara bars were around before any other "healthy" snack bars so it was only logical that Whole 30 made an exception so that people would have something in an emergency situation. Now that you have healthier alternatives like Epic bars though, there's really no reason one would ever need to eat a Lara bar. In my opinion, eating a Lara bar is no different than making paleo pizza or pancakes.
  14. Bagger Daves

    I'm not sure that it necessarily matters what it's cooked in. It's going to be cooked in some hydrogenated oil undoubtedly which is definitely bad, but it's allowed when and only when you eat out.
  15. Chapul Bars

    Thanks for the response. I went to their website and looked at their different bars. Most of them seem to be compliant. I assume the Bison Bacon Cranberry and the Wild Boar Bacon are out though due to the brown sugar, right?