lisac957

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  1. lisac957

    "Carb Loading" on whole 30

    Potatoes and sweet potatoes would be my go-to if on a round. Having done endurance sports for the last decade though, I don't think most people need to "carb load" beyond a normal serving of potatoes the night before a half marathon. Much more and you're likely to experience GI distress or feeling bloated/heavy for your race. Here's an article he may find helpful - it also describes the "carb depletion" part of the equation (not Whole30 specific, but can apply). Was he experiencing issues during long training runs that prompted the carb loading question? Typically the long training runs are the best time to experiment with this kind of stuff so you know what to expect on race day.
  2. lisac957

    Rural area....

    One suggestion regarding veggies. Buying one head of cabbage for the entire week wasn't sustainable from the get-go (you've said multiple times that you bought the one cabbage for your veg all week). Try buying a wide variety of veggies that can be used in multiple dishes. Think staples like onions, peppers, celery, carrots, zucchini, green beans, spinach, sweet potatoes, squash. You can "rice" heads of cauliflower and broccoli with a cheese grater (or of course, use the florets as-is). Limiting yourself to one vegetable for the entire week is going to set you up for failure. Please consider listening to everything @ladyshanny is saying instead of declaring defeat because you've tried a few things that weren't your cup of tea. There have been so many great suggestions here, but it feels like you are not taking them in at all and have a lot of excuses - to which everyone in this thread is graciously continuing to show you how you can work around. Saying things like "I don't know what else for breakfast is allowed" after SO MANY GREAT suggestions shows that you need to do a ton more research. And re-read all of the comments. None of that is bad; we all started out needing to research and learn. Wishing you the best.
  3. lisac957

    Rural area....

    Honestly, doing your own research and being responsible for your own program is a huge part of Whole30. Said with love, of course. "No recipe" meals like sweet potato hash are my go-to's when I don't want to bust out a recipe. Just throw a bunch of ingredients into a skillet: cubed sweet potatoes, onion, pepper, zucchini, apple, a compliant sausage or ground turkey - whatever you have on-hand - with a drizzle of olive oil and some seasonings. "No recipe" soups are also surprisingly simple and affordable. I like to make one with chicken broth, onion, celery, carrot, cubed potato and chicken sausage. Chili would fall in this category as well... ground beef or turkey, onion, pepper, carrot, sweet potato, tomato sauce, chili pepper - top with avocado. That kind of thing. Quick search yielded these recipes, all with simple ingredients. Roasted lemon chicken with potatoes and rosemary Jalapeno turkey burgers Grilled salmon with mango salsa Skillet beef fajitas Pork roast with sweet potatoes, apples and onions Tomato basil turkey meatloaf Beef enchilada bake
  4. lisac957

    Ironman (full) training

    Thank you @mountain_erin! EXACTLY the type of experiences I was hoping to read. Appreciate your detailed response!
  5. lisac957

    New Barn Unsweetened Almond Milk

    The kind in the green bottle (unsweetened almond milk) is W30 approved, it even has the logo on the back of the bottle. I found it at Whole Foods in my area. Image from their web site.
  6. I can appreciate this. I have plenty of these types of events for work as well. Whether we agree or not, doing things like busting out a pouch of tuna at a fancy event in front of your boss can label you as a lot of things you may not want to be associated with in a professional setting. Of course, if it was a more informal event, yeah go microwave your food in the break room or discretely hang out in the back with the dressing from your purse... but these more high profile events are difficult. Glad to see you found a solution. The last one I went to, I ate fruit for breakfast at 7:30 a.m., then couldn't eat again until about 4 p.m. I was running the event, so even more difficult.
  7. lisac957

    sausage + gluten

    I have been gluten free my entire life (Celiac) and have never heard this about sausage. Not once. Such a strange anecdote!
  8. lisac957

    Ironman (full) training

    No, not planning on doing it on a Whole30 round, but am trying to figure it out in the context of Food Freedom Forever. Just looking for others' experiences.
  9. Hi friends! Currently on Round 2 and am feeling so great, but am wondering how to incorporate what I've learned into loooooong-distance training and racing. I'm registered for my 5th Ironman in September, and will ramp up training after a March full marathon. In my past training, I have relied on an all-in-one product for my bike nutrition, since biking is the bulk of my time in training and in the race. It's a powder mixed with water, so easy to carry in bike bottles and concentrate so you're not carrying 5-6 bottles on the course. It's worked fabulously for me in the past in terms of energy levels, digestion, hunger, no adverse effects, etc., I am perfectly fine doing distances like a half marathon or even full marathon with items like dates, bananas and boiled potatoes. But when it comes to an Ironman, the sheer length of time I will be on the course presents a logistical issue that is not there in other shorter races (I have been a 15-hour Ironman in the past, but could be up to 17 hours if I have a bad day). It's simply not feasible to carry a lunch box with all of the nutrition and calories I would need for a 15+ hour endurance race. What have others done in this situation? Do you consider a product with sugar "worth it" for something like this, or have you found another solution? For reference, here are the ingredients of the all-in-one product I have used in the past: MaltodextrinDextroseNatural cane sugarCitric AcidNatural Grape FlavorsSea saltPotassium chlorideMagnesium gluconateCalcium lactate gluconateWhey protein isolateL-IsoleucineL-ValineL-LeucineCaffeine
  10. lisac957

    Running a 50K on day 20

    How much real food can you carry - do you have a camelbak or anything similar you're going to wear? If so, you can certainly carry things like boiled/salted white potatoes, roasted sweet potato chunks, dates, bananas, nuts, etc. You could also carry meat sticks or RXBars, but someone will point out that those are for "emergencies only." For me, the potatoes would be the key fuel, for both during and after the run. I would consider having a pre-prepared full, extra-servings meal waiting for you at the finish line, either chilling in your car or have a friend bring it. I'd probably opt for something like a hash with sweet potato, onion, pepper, chicken sausage, maybe some apple, maybe some eggs scrambled in. It's a hearty mix, and will probably taste good with the slight sweetness of the sweet potato and apple, plus the saltiness of the sausage. Coconut water is a popular choice for W30 endurance athletes in place of sports drink. I personally can't stand it, but worth trying if you haven't already. Last, and you likely already know this, but I would use this last month to practice this nutrition on your long runs. Test how you'll carry it, how you'll retrieve it, eat it without dropping, etc., and especially how it works performance-wise. You don't have a ton of time to adjust, but probably still have some long runs you can experiment with.
  11. lisac957

    Larabars should be OUTLAWED. Anything in a wrapper.

    https://whole30.com/2015/06/future/ Great information here that details a bit more of what was posted above and the reasoning behind only using as emergency food.
  12. lisac957

    How often do you grocery shop?

    I recently discovered frozen riced cauliflower, in addition to frozen veggie blends like onion/pepper (for Mexican-inspired dishes), broccoli/onion/celery/snap pea (for Asian-inspired dishes) and all sorts of other combinations. They are relatively cheap ($1-2 for a 4-serving bag which is 2 servings for me), contain ONLY vegetables and are a great time saver. I still enjoy the process of washing and cutting my own vegetables, but sometimes the frozen ones save the day.