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Marye

Fish on a almost daily base

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I'm not really sure where to draw the line but I know there's a concern with mercury in too much fish. I have a coworker that actually got mercury poisoning from too much tuna as he was trying to bulk up and eating a lot right out of the can. He ended up hallucinating at a client meeting and walking out of the room confused and lost! I think I've heard about 1 lb a week is a good amount to get some good omega 3, iodine, and add variety to your diet. Just make sure you're mixing up your protein sources so you're benefiting from other types of minerals and vitamins as well.

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As far as the Whole30 goes, we encourage people to eat a variety of protein sources. However, I don't know if there are meaningful nutritional differences between fish, beef, pork, chicken, lamb, bison, turkey, etc. I do know, for example, that beef liver and squid are both good sources of copper, so on the copper front, you could eat either one and be okay. Certainly consuming a variety of foods makes eating more interesting. I doubt there is a problem with eating fish every day because I am sure there are people living in fishing villages and on boats who do eat fish every day and enjoy good health. However, I would not recommend making fish your exclusive source of protein.

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There is a mercury concern related to eating lots and lots of fish, but really, it's only a major concern for pregnant women (and women trying to get pregnant within the year), nursing women, and small children. If you're not one of those but still concerned, just know that the bigger the fish, the higher the mercury content (they live longer and so have more time to build up naturally-occurring mercury). So, tuna, swordfish, shark, marlin, and sea bass are some you might try to limit, and you might try adding more sardines, scallops, shrimp, catfish, tilapia, and haddock (for example).

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