question about cooking with oil or fat in recipes


jenn1067

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maybe? Consider the "thumb" size portion of fat in the meal template as a minimum. If that's the amount of fat in your recipe and it satisfies you for 4-5 hours without snacking that's fine. If you get hungry, or just want the taste of more fat in a given meal, try having a little bit more.

 

ps. Also remember that some cooking fat stays in the pan, and what might seem like a lot of fat in a recipe is getting split up into several servings. basically know that most people hesitate to eat enough fat. Fat is good. eat more.

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Unless I am cooking something specifically for the fat--like salad dressing made with bacon and bacon grease--or pouring the fat in the pan over the meal, I ALWAYS add an additional fat. Don't count that fat in the pan as your fat. Fat is good, fat is yummy, fat is what carries flavor. Don't fear the fat. :)  ;)  

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  • 3 weeks later...

I'm new to this and plan to start the Whole 30 this week.  I also have a nutrition background and can't wrap my head around why vegetable oils are NOT ok when they contain "good fats" (unsaturated) and why coconut oil (which at mainly saturated fat) is one of the main fats to use. I'm sure there is some good reason for this.  Can someone please explain. I'm concerned since my cholesterol and triglycerides are a bit high (not enough for any medication).  It's likely hereditary, but consuming additional saturated fats concerns me a bit. Thanks in advance for any info.

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I'm new to this and plan to start the Whole 30 this week.  I also have a nutrition background and can't wrap my head around why vegetable oils are NOT ok when they contain "good fats" (unsaturated) and why coconut oil (which at mainly saturated fat) is one of the main fats to use. I'm sure there is some good reason for this.  Can someone please explain. I'm concerned since my cholesterol and triglycerides are a bit high (not enough for any medication).  It's likely hereditary, but consuming additional saturated fats concerns me a bit. Thanks in advance for any info.

 

This is simply old, out of date incorrect information. Vegetable oils are unstable, and go rancid quickly. They are high in omega 6 fats, when the modern diet is already too high in omega 6 (we need more omega 3 fats in our diets). Vegetable oils are highly processed as well, and about as far from natural as you could get.

 

Saturated fat, on the other hand is quite stable and can handle being used for cooking without oxidization. We've learned that dietary saturated fat has very little influence on blood cholesterol (instead, blood cholesterol raises in response to consumption of grains and sugar--or due to hereditary factors or inflammation). Besides, some blood cholesterol is needed to protect the brain, and trying to reduce this lower and lower is not always a good idea. 

 

Now, of course, you don't want the kind of highly processed saturated fat found in junk food either. Look for natural sources of clean fats, like lard from pastured pigs, coconut oil, ghee, etc. If the saturated fat idea is off-putting to you, be sure to include lots of other fats from things like olives, avocado, olive oil, etc.

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Lots of great info about the benefits of natural saturated fats can be found in the books "It Starts With Food" (Hartwig) and "The Paleo Cure" (Kresser)... plenty of detailed scientific facts in the latter, very interesting. I encourage you to read up on the subject of FAT and arm yourself with information, the facts speak for themselves... and the body knows what it needs, so it will start responding accordingly, even if your brain hasn't quite wrapped itself around the idea yet! I know it is challenging to let go of the old mindset (which is based on outdated and inaccurate research), but shifting your perspective on this particular subject will be VERY important for your success with the Whole30 program. Give your body what it NEEDS to thrive!!

Here are a few articles to get you started:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/07/27/saturated-fat-cholesterol.aspx

https://chriskresser.com/the-diet-heart-myth-cholesterol-and-saturated-fat-are-not-the-enemy/

http://paleoleap.com/fear-of-saturated-fat-and-cholesterol/

Good luck! : )

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  • 3 months later...

Adding to this question: I may be blind, but I haven't found a list of non compliant oils anywhere, besides butter and veg oils...have I completely overlooked it and it is right there somewhere? Searches don't seem to be turning it up.

I'm trying to perfect my 30 by asking about cooking oils and non compliant mayo, for example, when I eat out. I have a grasp of the sugar story, but am still struggling with this. For example, some folks I admire in the forums recommend macadamia nut oil to add to tea...just want to check the rules on nut oils, etc.

Many thanks. If I,ve missed a whole page or blog post on this, please just provide a link.

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Adding to this question: I may be blind, but I haven't found a list of non compliant oils anywhere, besides butter and veg oils...have I completely overlooked it and it is right there somewhere? Searches don't seem to be turning it up.

I'm trying to perfect my 30 by asking about cooking oils and non compliant mayo, for example, when I eat out. I have a grasp of the sugar story, but am still struggling with this. For example, some folks I admire in the forums recommend macadamia nut oil to add to tea...just want to check the rules on nut oils, etc.

Many thanks. If I,ve missed a whole page or blog post on this, please just provide a link.

 

There's not really a list of specifically non-compliant oils. Obviously, soybean oil, corn oil, and peanut oil are out because those three things are not allowed. Other nut and seed oils are allowed. Canola/vegetable oil is addressed in the Can I Have list.

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When the recipe calls for 3 tablespoons of cooking fats should we alter the amount of cooking fat depending on which fat you are using? I just tried making the perfect scrambled eggs which says to use 3 tablespoons. I used ghee but when I poured the eggs into the oil there was way too much oil and the eggs sunk to the bottom under an inch of oil! Have I missed something in the book?

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when I poured the eggs into the oil there was way too much oil and the eggs sunk to the bottom under an inch of oil! Have I missed something in the book?

 

There is no way three tablespoons would produce an inch of oil, so something is off here for sure. Did you use a measuring spoon or some other kind of spoon (like a soup spoon?)?

 

Ultimately, use the amount of cooing fat that feels right to you. If a small amount feels right, note that and remember you need to add more fat to your meal in some form.

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  • 1 month later...

There is no way three tablespoons would produce an inch of oil, so something is off here for sure. Did you use a measuring spoon or some other kind of spoon (like a soup spoon?)?

 

Ultimately, use the amount of cooing fat that feels right to you. If a small amount feels right, note that and remember you need to add more fat to your meal in some form.

missmary, I really appreciate your well thought out responses. They are always informative and I am always learning something from you. 

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