Panicking about travel during Whole30


HannahSwain

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Hi all,

This is my first Whole30. I chose to do one starting on August 1st even before I knew a whole bunch of people were because of this trip I have to do next week - I wanted to find even more motivation to stay on track. As it approaches, though, I realize I'm panicking about how to handle it and probably not thinking incredibly clearly. It's starting to turn into one big huge nightmare in my head, while it probably doesn't have to be. I'm kind of hoping that you guys can look at this and say "that's not such a big obstacle" or "did you think of x, y and z?" I'd really appreciate any feedback or input people would be willing to give!

This is also after having read the travel guide that was mentioned in this morning's Whole30 newsletter.

The trip involves a weekend trip from Europe to the US for a wedding, I fly out on Friday and return on Monday afternoon. I'm going to try and stay on my personal timezone as much as possible, since it's not worth beating jetlag for those few days.

I have a 6:30 am flight out of Stockholm Arlanda with two hours' layover in Amsterdam, putting me in Boston for about 13:00 local time (19:00 on my personal timezone). Can I conceivably bring enough food and keep it cool enough to be safe, considering space in carry-on, liquid contraints, etc?

I then need to get a rental car in Boston and drive 130 miles/3 hours to New Hampshire, where I'll arrive in the middle of the wedding rehearsal/bbq dinner. I'm going to be dead by this point, so hopefully food won't be an issue.

The next day is wedding prep and Sunday is the actual wedding. I think there will be a lot of bbq food. I'm afraid they'll have things like corn on the cob and grilled potatoes, which everybody knows are my favorites - isn't it so much harder to say no when people have made something especially for you?

I'm also afraid of my food preferences being seen as an irritation while everybody is stressed about the wedding happening.

I won't have my own kitchen and I'm not sure how much my family will appreciate me using theirs, so I'll need to keep any meal prep to a minimum. I will have my own rental car, though, so I can always go find a diner and get eggs or raid the supermarket. Is it feasible to survive on this kind of piecemeal food, though?

Then there's the flight back - preparing food is going to be harder, since I don't have my own kitchen to use to put stuff together.

I guess it comes down to some questions:

- Any ideas for traveling light with no real ability to keep stuff cool for long flights?

- Any tips for dealing with food when staying with other (potentially stressed) people?

- Any tips for saying no to the "but I made this just for you!" comment which is well meant?

Written down like this, it really doesn't seem like as much of a disaster as I was starting to think. Still, there are sizeable obstacles in there, so any kind of help is appreciated!

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Call the airline and special order food that you can have. They probably have some options. Ask the airline specifically about bringing food with you so you know constraints. I don't think fresh fruit is allowed on an international flight, but I could be wrong. Meat could be an issue too. The rules get very specific so the airline is your best place to start.

Once you are here you will have plenty of options. So many veggies can be eaten raw. You can buy an inexpensive cooler and fill with ice to keep your food separate so you don't inconvenience whoever you are staying with. Applegate Farms hot dogs, roast beef, pre-cooked Hard boiled eggs from the grocery store, baby carrots, grape tomatoes, cucumbers, nuts, olives, fresh fruit etc. Not exciting but no cooking required either. Check online to see if there is a Whole Foods anywhere near where you will be. Great place for Whole30 compliant stuff.

To reduce your stress, perhaps just plan to extend your Whole30 to a Whole45. Then it might not be so upsetting if you deviate from your well planned trip and eat something non-compliant either by accident or out of necessity because you have no other option.

Enjoy your trip!!!

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Travelling is tough! I travel across the US for business so my flights are usually 5 hours. I'm tired, cranky and the airports always smell like cinnamon buns :-) I have one of those small soft coolers that I can stuff in my carry-on. Ice is a mess, so I have one of those small blue things that I keep in the freezer. I bring veggies (carrots and celery), hard boiled eggs, beef jerky, nuts and fruit.

Here's a secret that I learned the hard way while I was flying internationally - there is no limit to what you can bring ON the plane. But if you don't finish your snacks, give them to the flight attendant to throw away. DO NOT take food off the plane on an international flight. You'll be relegated to the slow line for a thorough search. One time when I was landing in LAX, I had an apple and figured I'd throw it out on the way to Immigration. Wrong! There were NO trash cans between the gate and Immigration. So uneaten snacks - leave 'em on the plane! You can stock up again after you land.

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Stop at a grocery store in Boston area after you land. They have several Whole Foods there. Stock up. They have coolers and ice, too.

Also, I find that semi-fasting and catching up on my water consumption during air or car travel works well. Then when I reach mydestination I can scope out compliant food and eat with abandon.

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  • 2 years later...

I travel for a living - I am a flight attendant - and I bring enough TSA compliant food with me for each day, and scope out grocery stores on layovers. If you are traveling in the US, it is pretty easy, but international gets tricky. I carry Primal Pacs with me, but have to check with each country I go to (Many don't allow any beef to be imported due to "mad cow disease". Right now I am in Spain and just had an excellent salad made from organic veggies I sourced from a supermarket, supplemented with octopus and langoustines in vinegar and evoo. The Google Translate app on my Android phone is great, I can figure out the ingredients in things and ask questions.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Ash.in.CT!

I travel for a living too but I'm not a flight attendant. I do though love the idea that you as a flight attendant believe in the whole9 lifestyle.

I'm hoping you could answer a few questions...

Suewaz has a great point! Coming back to the stares with fruits, meats etc is not wise! However my question is what about other countries?

I go to India and Africa a lot and fly through London, Paris and the UAE frequently. I have found great option for protien sources to fly with like grass fed whole30 compliant beef sticks and my fav the epic bars! Canned tuna, salmon and even canned sweet potato and canned butternut squash have been good suggestions for vegetable/carb options and I'm not worried about fruits or nuts. I even thought shoot I could check jarred olives and just hope no one steals them out of my checked bag.

What I do get frustrated about is healthy vegetable and fat options. My trips are often fast and furious so buying produce and cooking it is not in my favor always. And really it's not recommended to eat uncooked vegetables on the go from markets or at restaurants in the countries I visit (unless they have a peel that you yourself peel off).

So I thought maybe you could answer this...

Do you think I could get through places like London and into places like India etc with whole avocados, or hearty veggies like carrots or different greens, maybe a zucchini?

Haha I know it sounds ridiculous but when I travel I craaaaaaaaave veggies!

My only other possible solution would be like an organic whole30 approved baby food pouch that has veggies in it I guess. But hopefully that's last resort.

Any thoughts would be appreciated!

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Permitted 3.4 oz.

  • Cranberry sauce
  • Cologne
  • Creamy dips and spreads (cheeses, peanut butter, etc.)
  • Gift baskets with food items (salsa, jams and salad dressings)
  • Gravy
  • Jams
  • Jellies
  • Lotions
  • Maple syrup
  • Oils and vinegars
  • Perfume
  • Salad dressing
  • Salsa
  • Sauces
  • Snow Globes
  • Soups
  • Wine, liquor and beer

You should call ahead to see how many pouches of baby food are allowed.  Zucchini squash and cucumbers     :D  :lol:  :D 

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 years later...

I was seeking guidance on this topic also searching the forum. One of the things I am worried about in the morning are eggs. From what I gather most breakfast doesn't really exist in Italy. We are staying at all hotels so I have no ability to cook.  Our breakfast is included at all hotels and I am assuming will be mostly fruit and pastries. Breakfast starts my day and hope I can find something of substance. There is no way I am not going to Italy and not enjoying some bread and wine but want to try to keep mostly on track. With EVOO being so fresh and made there does anyone know cooking habits at restaurants? Do they soak in butter or just the freshness of the ingredients lend to more clean cooking. Perhaps I'm being optimistic! I plan on traveling with some nuts and bars and although I don't eat those regularly in the states figured it was better than eating a baguette when I'm hungry!  Any Italy travel advice would be appreciated. 

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4 hours ago, Llong915 said:

I was seeking guidance on this topic also searching the forum. One of the things I am worried about in the morning are eggs. From what I gather most breakfast doesn't really exist in Italy. We are staying at all hotels so I have no ability to cook.  Our breakfast is included at all hotels and I am assuming will be mostly fruit and pastries. Breakfast starts my day and hope I can find something of substance. There is no way I am not going to Italy and not enjoying some bread and wine but want to try to keep mostly on track. With EVOO being so fresh and made there does anyone know cooking habits at restaurants? Do they soak in butter or just the freshness of the ingredients lend to more clean cooking. Perhaps I'm being optimistic! I plan on traveling with some nuts and bars and although I don't eat those regularly in the states figured it was better than eating a baguette when I'm hungry!  Any Italy travel advice would be appreciated. 

I notice you've asked this question in a couple of different places on the forum -- please don't do that. There's no need to repeat the same post over and over, and it's not really in keeping with the forum rules to do so. It may take some time to get an answer, especially for something very specific like this, but usually someone will come along with an answer.

I have never traveled to Italy, so I can't give you specifics, but my guess is if you find hotels and restaurants that cater to Americans, you'll find places that offer heartier breakfasts. They may still not be completely Whole30 compliant, but they'll probably have eggs or meat or other protein along with whatever breads

 

 

 

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