Chicken broth/stock vs. bone broth


kt_whole

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Sorry, slw600 but it's not just semantics. To make bone broth, the bones need to be cooked low and slow for a long time...usually with some vinegar (just a little, like 1/4 cup per stock pot) to help draw out minerals. Typical chicken and beef stock that you can purchase is most likely NOT bone broth. Commercially produced stuff won't have the mineral content, so it won't have the health benefits.

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To go a bit further, broth has meat and bone in it, stock does not, unless it is clinging to the joint. When I make my stocks and broths, I will roast the meat or bones along with the carrots, celery, garlic, onion, etc., for about an hour at 350 or so, to get a good browning and then I scrap all the bones, juices, yummy bits and what ever into my stock pot. Add vinegar, water to cover, and bring to a boil. I skim the yuck and then turn it down to a simmer and add what ever spices/herbs and let it go. Chicken goes 24-48 hours, beef up to 72 hours, making sure that the bones/meat and veg are under water.

After decanting and discarding the solids, I sometimes will reduce the stock or bone broth down by half to make storing easier. Hth!

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Sorry, slw600 but it's not just semantics. To make bone broth, the bones need to be cooked low and slow for a long time...usually with some vinegar (just a little, like 1/4 cup per stock pot) to help draw out minerals. Typical chicken and beef stock that you can purchase is most likely NOT bone broth. Commercially produced stuff won't have the mineral content, so it won't have the health benefits.

Well, I always make broth/stock that way (minus the vinegar) and have never made it any differently. I never considered the fact that the OP was questioning homemade vs purchased. Shows what assuming does for ya.

I also did not clarify that broth contains meat (I never stop with broth...always take the meat off the bones and then continue to stock) and stock is bones only, so really, we should call it bone stock. Back to semantics....

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I also did not clarify that broth contains meat

Now it's my turn to clarify what I said above: personally I find the version with some meat left on the bones to be tastier. I'm not sure if it is more nutritious, but I think that's what most people mean by "bone broth" (vs. the hypothetical bone stock).

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Okay to totally clarify what I mean. :) When I take a whole pastured chicken and add it to my stock pot or slow cooker along with carrots,onions, celery, garlic and lemons and then remove it after an hour or so, I call that broth. Then when I remove the meat, put the bones back and continue to cook for 4 to 12 hours, I call that stock. Why Bone Broth is a popular term, I don't know except that it sounds cool. I think a little meat left on the bones makes very little difference in the taste or nutrition. It's mostly boiled or simmered for hours, so it pretty much looses any taste benefit.

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Let me first say, I am not much of a cook. I simmer bones in water for a long time and call it broth. Never thought much more about whether that's what it really is. Have not made "bone broth" just yet but hope to soon.

So I read through all the posts in this thread and got confused. Then I checked the mother of all sources (wink, wink) - Wikipedia. And I think it's actually still pretty confusing... :)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beef_stock

I figure as long as we don't buy the cans or cartons in the grocery store, what we make at home must be good for us no matter what it is called. :)

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Let me first say, I am not much of a cook. I simmer bones in water for a long time and call it broth. Never thought much more about whether that's what it really is. Have not made "bone broth" just yet but hope to soon.

So I read through all the posts in this thread and got confused. Then I checked the mother of all sources (wink, wink) - Wikipedia. And I think it's actually still pretty confusing... :)

http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Beef_stock

I figure as long as we don't buy the cans or cartons in the grocery store, what we make at home must be good for us no matter what it is called. :)

OOO..just a caution. You and I or anyone else can manipulate what is on Wiki, so never an absolute. Our health care company fights Wiki stuff ALL the time. You could say dark means the sun is down and I could dispute it and it will show up on Wiki as a truth. Just a cautionary tale.

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OOO..just a caution. You and I or anyone else can manipulate what is on Wiki, so never an absolute. Our health care company fights Wiki stuff ALL the time. You could say dark means the sun is down and I could dispute it and it will show up on Wiki as a truth. Just a cautionary tale.

LOL. I know. Just tried to look up a quick non culinary arts/ chef explanation out of curiosity. Can't use Wikipedia for a research paper but for my purpose tonight it was just fine. That's why I said wink, wink... :)

Off to bed. Why am I still up?

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Thanks for all the input! I usually make my own chicken/beef stock at home, but didn't know about the vinegar part. Will work towards that next. Thanks again!

I am on Day 16 and continuing to strive for 100% compliance with the Whole30 - thanks to folks like you who respond to my questions!!

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  • 4 years later...

I know I'm late to the party but my take on it is that bone broth uses bones (preferably soaked in a vinegar/water solution before cooking) and a long cooking process, or pressure cooker, to make a broth rich in nutrients contained within these bones.  Some people have always made their broths and stocks this way so the term seems like a matter of semantic to them.  I always did but I also was also aware that the broth I learned to make was very different than typical broths most people were making especially commercial broths.  For example, my broth (my mom's and her mom's etc broths) always turned to gelatin in the fridge but this wasn't something typically happening to my friend's broths and commercial broths.  I considered them all broth/stock but understood there was a difference to mine and my method.  Now I have a name for it, bone broth.

 

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