LisaWisaAnn

Binge eating - how do I break this nasty cycle?

Recommended Posts

My Brain over Binge book arrived yesterday.  Now wondering if I should read it secretly or freak out my husband?   :blink:

Does your husband not know?  I was really nervous to tell my husband (at the time he was a boyfriend I think... maybe fiance, I can't remember :) ).  But either way I felt like I was admitting this awful terrible truth.  He was like, eh, whatever, how can I help?  It makes it so much easier to have him know and support me.  Using the book might be a good way to bring it up... I have this problem, I'm working on it, I just want you to know... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does your husband not know?  I was really nervous to tell my husband (at the time he was a boyfriend I think... maybe fiance, I can't remember :) ).  But either way I felt like I was admitting this awful terrible truth.  He was like, eh, whatever, how can I help?  It makes it so much easier to have him know and support me.  Using the book might be a good way to bring it up... I have this problem, I'm working on it, I just want you to know... 

Husband knows it as history, but probably not too aware of the struggle now.  He is an MD and thinks like an MD and a man combined.  That makes it hard to have empathy, in my opinion (sorry guys, I know some of you are probably very empathetic).  He is a pull yourself up by your bootstraps kind of person.  Works for him.  He's very grounded.  I told him many years ago (when dating) that I was taking anti-depressants for an eating disorder and he admitted he had trouble with that knowledge.  He just didn't get it then... we were 22?   Since then I have not shared all that much but trying to do more now.  I think I will read it openly and allow him to approach me.  I'm certainly not that 22 yr old person anymore and I guess he needs to know that, too.  We will see what happens.   In the past he had little patience for talking about things that happened in the past; more of a 'let's make a plan and fix it now.  The past is over.  Get over it."  In a nice way, of course.   :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have an issue with binge eating, but my husband does. I find the best way to control portion sizes is using what we jokingly call 'snifter bowls'. They are those tiny glass dipping bowls you find in Asian grocery stores, or small ramekins. I fill one with a handful of nuts or he fills his with a handful of chocolate chips and that's it. Eating directly out of the bag is a recipe for trouble, binge eating or not. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand so much of what you are all saying. Whole 30 I feel has give me back clarity around food, from a former binger / purger to one that is doing ok ..... I say ok because I don't want to jinx myself !!! Brain over binge is a very good book and it certainly started the process of deciding I could no longer carry on with this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a recovered compulsive overeater, 3 years on, who suffered from binging and overeating for over 20 years. If you truly are binging and find yourself unable to control it seek professional help. A therapist who specializes in eating disorders, OA, eating disorder treatment program; someplace to get support and help, it can't be done alone. You can check out the website http://www.something-fishy.org it is loaded with information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two things... One is to think of compliant foods not as just a list of foods, but as a method of eating. There are foods that are compliant, but only when eaten in the proper context. Both nuts and fruit are more to be used as condiments, in small portions or as part of a recipe. My understanding is that bars are not to be eaten except in an emergency. And if you are eating, it should follow the template, and not be isolated foods.

Aside from emotional reasons for eating (i second and third what others wrote regarding OA and/or therapy), the food you eat can exacerbate binges. For instance, dates (an average medjool) has 4 tsp of sugar per date. That is over a tablespoon. 20 dates is over 1.5 cups of sugar! Oooh! That could certainly trigger cravings for days to come.

*Be kind to yourself* and try to eat following the Whole 30 meal template. It spells it out clearly, and was very, very helpful to me!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well here I am on day 26 and I have not been snacking at all.  I don't know what has happened to me but I just don't want anything to eat between meals and sometime I don't even want to eat at dinner time.  I do try to have a fat, protein and some veggies but find it very difficult to do.  I have not gotten on the scale yet so I have no idea if I have lost any weight but that was my main reason for this journey.  My BP has dropped a bit to 106/68 and I'm feeling great.  A couple of times I have felt a bit dizzy when I was working outside but still really did not want anything to eat.  I have had not problems going out to dinner with my husband.  I get salads with grilled chicken and no dressing and have really learned to enjoy the taste of the veggies with no dressing or sauce on them.  My husband eats ice cream daily and I have no desire to have any.  Guess my mind is just made up that this is going to work for me and it is.  Hang in there.  We can do this. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a different perspective on all this. I think we're actually designed to binge eat, because for much of our evolutionary history, food was feast or famine for us. Think about it: If your clan kills a mammoth, you're going to stuff yourselves with mammoth meat as long and as hard as you can before it spoils. Because there will be times when mammoth are scarce and you're nibbling on bugs. You should read accounts of feasts or potlatches among tribal cultures, where they literally ate themselves into unconsciousness. So everyone who has a "problem" with binge eating, give yourself a little bit of a break. You're not defective. You're following the urgent dictates of millennia of evolutionary adaptation.

 

 

 

 

 Andrew Badenoch's line: "Paleo is a logical framework applied to modern humans, not a historical reenactment."   I don't believe we have to reenact our evolutionary history.  Another binge is not a cure for a food addiction.

 

http://forum.whole9life.com/topic/20826-did-you-find-yourself-sweeter-and-kinder-after-whole30-reintro/page-22

 

Read the last 3 articles on this thread.... ;) 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a different perspective on all this. I think we're actually designed to binge eat, because for much of our evolutionary history, food was feast or famine for us. Think about it: If your clan kills a mammoth, you're going to stuff yourselves with mammoth meat as long and as hard as you can before it spoils. Because there will be times when mammoth are scarce and you're nibbling on bugs.

 

 

I agree with you this far, but that does not mean that binge eating is normal ... not for modern day Americans who have more than enough food and no scarcity to speak of!  However, you are correct that we do have this evolutionary drive ... for this reason, restricting our food intake or intake of vital fats/nutrients (i.e. artificially imitating a famine within one's own body) ultimately leads to binge-eating in most people.  Your body and mind can only take so much food restriction before it will override you and command you to EAT.  And unlike for our ancestors, we have plenty of high-calorie food surrounding us so a binge is nearly always a possibility.  

 

If you are suffering from binge-eating, I would take a look at your diet and your relationship with food.  Do you try to eat smaller portions than you're truly hungry for? Try to resist snacks when you need them? Feel guilty for eating something high in good fats?  Berate yourself after eating a normal-sized meal?  Have an intense focus on weight and body shape?  This combination of mental and physical factors will likely lead to a binge.

 

Aside from finding a good counselor, one easy change I would recommend is to focus on eating mindfully.  This is discussed in ISWF to some extent.  Make a diary or find an app to use and before and after you eat, rate your PHYSICAL hunger on a 1-10 scale (google hunger scale to get a good idea of the parameters).  Write down any thoughts/feelings/emotions you have before, during and after the meal.  You will be surprised what an impact this can have on understanding what drives you to eat when you're not hungry, and recognizing your internal hunger cues.

 

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now