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ladalton

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Thanks for the link.  I appreciate it.  Slim-Fast is  #15  and Med-Fast is  #28.   

 

Based on those standings and such delicious ingredients in a can...

 

Nutrition facts: per serving, 190 cals, 6g fat, 200mg sodium, 5g fiber, 18g sugar, 10g protein

INGREDIENTS: Fat Free Milk, Sugar, Cocoa (Processed With Alkali), Canola Oil, Fructose, Calcium Caseinate, Gum Arabic, Cellulose Gel, Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Mono and Diglycerides, Potassium Phosphate, Soybean Lecithin, Cellulose Gum, Carrageenan, Isolated Soy Protein, Artificial Flavor, Maltodextrin, Sucralose and Acesulfame (Nonnutritive Sweeteners), Dextrose, Potassium Carrageenan, Citric Acid and Sodium Citrate. Vitamins and Minerals: Magnesium Phosphate, Calcium Phosphate, Sodium Ascorbate, Vitamin E Acetate, Zinc Gluconate, Ferric Orthophosphate, Niacinamide, Calcium Pantothenate, Manganese Sulfate, Vitamin A Palmitate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin, Thiamin Mononitrate, Folic Acid, Chromium Chloride, Biotin, Sodium Molybdate, Potassium Iodide, Phylloquinone (Vitamin K1), Sodium Selenite, Cyanocobalamin (Vitamin B12) and Cholecalciferol (Vitamin D3).

 

 

I'll keep on dancing with the one who brought me to place of health and overall well being.  It's not bragging if it's true.  That is all.  

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When the #1 pick involves meal replacement shakes, I lose interest in anything else that panel has to say.

 

So true!  I guess I was just hoping for something a little more enlightened from a national news publication. :wacko:

 

I think Michael Pollan sums it up pretty well: Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants

 

Thank you for weighing in, folks!

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Tied for "worst of the worst for healthy eating"? Sounds like it was evaluated by someone who didn't actually do the program.

 

When I'm on the 30, my diet is more or less a whole mess of vegetables, a variety of fruits, different kinds of animal proteins in limited quantities, and some healthy vegetable fats, I contrast this to the S.A.D., and wonder how this is not healthy eating?

 

One of my pet peeves is when programs get misrepresented. The Fuhrman book lost me when it criticized other plans by misrepresenting what those plans were really about. (for example, Weight Watchers is not actually about being able to eat junk food - at its heart it's about portion control, accountability, and community-based support. These are things that are successful for some people. By all means, criticize the program if you wish, but by saying YOU CAN EAT JUNK FOOD ON THIS, you're really missing the point of the WW plan).

 

Anyway, I get prickly when I think Whole30 is misrepresented in any one of the number of ways it can get misrepresented. Anything that's saying it's "the worst of the worst for healthy eating" has definitely missed the message - completely.

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There's nothing new under the sun.  All dieting programs are morphed ideas or copies from someone before them.   Atkins program is 50 years old.

 

The variations on a theme.  They present it as if they've been up to the mountain like Moses and are providing something new to the masses.   Another ten commandments of dieting and weight loss.

 

Scientific journals have their place.  You can read every single one of them until the cows come home but if it doesn't change your relationship with food...what do you have?

 

Whole 30 is about changing your relationship with food.   You can vary it up and flirt with over-restriction and turn it into a hybrid.  You can add your own take on top of it and really micro analyze and police every morsel of food until you don't know whether to scratch your watch or wind your tail. 

 

Fat, fat, fat.   I knew that at  Hello.  I read my Whole 30 book.   I've also known that from my ancestors.  FAT is where it's at but the big picture is a positive relationship with food.  For life.  

 

Changing your relationship with food and getting off of the gerbil treadmill of  counting steps like a caged animal and obsessive food thoughts and dieting is where the rubber meets the road. 

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  • Whole30 Certified Coach

From the #1 DASH Diet

 

For a 2,000-calorie diet, you should shoot each day (unless otherwise noted) for 6-8 servings of grains; 4-5 each of veggies and fruit; 2-3 of fat-free or low-fat dairy; 6 or fewer of lean meat, poultry and fish...

 

ARGH!!!  How is the medical and conventional nutrition world SO WRONG?!  This makes me livid.

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I've done similar programs as the ones on the top of the list - none of which have made me conscious of how my body reacts to food as much as I do now. After those diets, I go back to my old ways and a couple of months later I'm exactly where I started (or worse).

 

Even though I'm not fully through it yet, I don't see whole30 as a diet anymore (even though I admit that I did when I first read about it) - I don't have to be hungry, feel guilty all the time for feeding myself or miss out on delicious food, but rather I get to enjoy all kinds of natural goodies until my body says it has received enough nutrients and feels happily satieted. Doesn't mean I don't miss a glass of wine every now and again, but honestly, I don't need it and my body does not benefit from it.

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It (the ranking) might matter if the Whole30 was a weight-loss diet.  Which of course it isn't.  I'd be curious to see how the rank programs in terms of their success in life-altering changes to people's relationship with food and long-term health effects as a result thereof.

 

:rolleyes:

 

Silly wabbit!  No one wants to talk about changing our relationship with food.  We just want to be "healthy" (read: skinny) as quickly as humanly possible. :wacko:

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Who ever made up this list had no idea what the Whole30 is. They just say eliminate grains, dairy, etc. and said it wasn't healthy. They never took into account it was only for 30 days and then you begin to reintroduce the foods you had not eaten to see how you reacted. The new Weight Watcher Smart Points plan has finally put emphasis, not enough in my opinion, on more protein, fruits and vegetables, and made the points really high for snack foods and carbs. Dr. Atkins had it almost right 50 years ago and we are just now getting around to his thinking. The American Heart Association has completely reversed its stand on cholesterol. It now says dietary cholesterol does not have impact on heart health. I know when I stick to Whole30 foods I feel so much better and pain free.

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

Well, I gotta say, I've done every diet from liquid, to shakes, Atkins, Weight Watchers, Mayo Clinic...ad  nauseum. 

The difference between those and Whole 30 is that I'm eating healthy, satisfying, delicious food and I feel amazing on Day 24 (my first challenge). 

On those other diets I was always looking for my next "free day," cravings were ridiculous, and I felt deprived. 

I plan to continue my challenge until my birthday (March 10) because I thought I'd want to "go crazy," but honestly, I don't want to. I feel so good right now: not tired, high energy, sleeping well, no headaches, skin is clearer, no bloating. 

I never felt this way on those other "diets." 

 

Haters gonna hate.  

:rolleyes:

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Tied for "worst of the worst for healthy eating"? Sounds like it was evaluated by someone who didn't actually do the program.

 

When I'm on the 30, my diet is more or less a whole mess of vegetables, a variety of fruits, different kinds of animal proteins in limited quantities, and some healthy vegetable fats, I contrast this to the S.A.D., and wonder how this is not healthy eating?

 

One of my pet peeves is when programs get misrepresented. The Fuhrman book lost me when it criticized other plans by misrepresenting what those plans were really about. (for example, Weight Watchers is not actually about being able to eat junk food - at its heart it's about portion control, accountability, and community-based support. These are things that are successful for some people. By all means, criticize the program if you wish, but by saying YOU CAN EAT JUNK FOOD ON THIS, you're really missing the point of the WW plan).

 

Anyway, I get prickly when I think Whole30 is misrepresented in any one of the number of ways it can get misrepresented. Anything that's saying it's "the worst of the worst for healthy eating" has definitely missed the message - completely.

Seriously, how can this be the "worst of the worst"? 

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On those other diets I was always looking for my next "free day," cravings were ridiculous, and I felt deprived. 

I plan to continue my challenge until my birthday (March 10) because I thought I'd want to "go crazy," but honestly, I don't want to. I feel so good right now: not tired, high energy, sleeping well, no headaches, skin is clearer, no bloating. 

 

 

So true. I was really in no hurry to do the reintroductions, simply because I was enjoying the program.

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  • 3 months later...

I think the article is irrelevant as it is judging the whole30 against diets which are purely for weight loss. My understanding is that weight loss is only a possible by product of doing the whole30, it certainly isn't the aim of it. I am doing the diet purely for health reasons as a manageable elimination diet and whether it works or not I will be judging by my symptoms and not weight loss at all.

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