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Yeast extract

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According to Wikipedia, "Yeast extract is the common name for various forms of processed yeast products made by extracting the cell contents (removing the cell walls); they are used as food additives or flavorings, or as nutrients for bacterial culture media. They are often used to create savory flavors and umami taste sensations, and can be found in a large variety of packaged food including frozen meals, crackers, junk food, gravy, stock and more... Yeast extract contains an amount of naturally occurring Glutamic Acid or Monosodium Glutamate." To read the entire article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yeast_extract

Many believe that food companies use yeast extract to hide the presence of MSG in foods from consumers. Here is a clear statement of the issue: http://www.naturalnews.com/001528_dangerous_ingredients_yeast_extract.html

You should avoid yeast extract during a Whole30 to avoid even small amounts of MSG.

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Uuuugggggggh, NO! Okay, I used about a 1/4 cup of this broth to cook with because I had it on hand and everything else looked okay. Crud. I split it with my spouse, so I probably only ate 2 Tbsp... and "yeast extract" was low on the list... do I have to start over??

Man. I knew better. I didn't know what I was. Shouldn't have eaten it. :(

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This is a tricky one. While yeast does contain glutamate, so do plenty of other foods with protein, like meat. The glutamate isn't the issue - it's when these proteins are hydrolyzed at high temperature, creating a different form of glutamate (a less healthy form).

I've read both sides, and I'm not convinced that yeast extract contains the unhealthy form of MSG - which is fundamentally, chemically different from glutamic acid. But I'm also not convinced that people who are very sensitive to MSG wouldn't have a reaction when exposed to this particular form.

We say nutritional yeast is okay for the Whole30, and I doubt that yeast extract is going to present a problem for 99.99% of folks doing the program. But for now, as Tom said, we'll encourage you to look for foods and products without these added ingredients, or better yet - just make your own chicken broth. However, I would see no need to start over because you ate some yeast extract in your soup.

Best,

Melissa

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I found that Swanson's makes a chicken stock that doesn't have yeast extract in it.  But All the beef no matter who's has yeast extract in it so I use the Swanson's chicken stock and I will be making my own beef stock if I find a good recipe.  

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Does anyone know if we can have Bragg's Nutritional Yeast Flakes?  I have looked in the book and in a few places before finally asking.  This is the closest topic I've seen to my question.  Here are the ingredients:  Inactive Dry Yeast, Niacin (B3), Pyridoxine HCI (B6), Riboflavin (B2), Thiamin HCI (B1), Folic Acid, and Vitamin B12.

 

Also stated on the bottle:  This product contains no salt, sugar, no egg, milk, gluten, wheat, corn, no starch, soy, animal derivatives, no artificial colors and preservatives, no Candida albicans yeast or brewery by-products as in brewer's yeast.

 

I miss sprinkling this stuff on my salads, so I thought I'd ask before ruining my 19 days!  Thank you for any help! :)

 

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I bought 10 cans of Island Sun Salmon, and they have yeast extract. 

 

I'd like to eat the Salmon, as it's a low cost source of protein compared to the 7 dollars a pound for my grass fed beef.

 

Not sure how much I trust the Island Sun label, as their nutritional info seems extremely out of wack. 

 

What's the current line on this?  Should I just eat it, or should I buy a different brand of Salmon and save this for after Whole 30?

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I bought 10 cans of Island Sun Salmon, and they have yeast extract. 

 

I'd like to eat the Salmon, as it's a low cost source of protein compared to the 7 dollars a pound for my grass fed beef.

 

Not sure how much I trust the Island Sun label, as their nutritional info seems extremely out of wack. 

 

What's the current line on this?  Should I just eat it, or should I buy a different brand of Salmon and save this for after Whole 30?

In Melissa's post above, she says outright, we would encourage you to look for products that do not contain yeast extract. That would be the current line on this. Post here: http://forum.whole30.com/topic/2989-yeast-extract/?p=26128

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Thank you ladyshanny.

 

I did read that post.  It was from 2012, and Melissa said "But for now..." when giving her advice, as it seemed like the science of the situation was still unsure.  Was just seeing if there was any further info on it. 

 

I guess I'm still not sure if I should just eat the salmon or not :huh:  

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Let me ask a different way.

 

I am paying $7 a pound for 80/20 Grass-fed organic beef.  While I could pay $2.49 a pound for grain fed beef, I understand the difference and am willing (at least some of the time) to pay the extra cost.

 

With the Salmon, Island Sun is $1 a can, Chicken of the Sea is $1,79 where I am.  I'm having a frustration factor with trying to determine if that extra 80c is worth it per can to avoid the yeast if 99.99 percent of people are not likely to be effected.  Yet, I like to try to stay within the lines of the program.  I'm an overly black-and-white person sometimes, my apologies.

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Yes, the .80 is worth it because part of what the Whole30 teaches you is that manufacturers put unnecessary additives and fillers in our food... We know that yeast extract is not necessary because you can find a slightly more expensive brand that doesn't have it... so the reason that unnecessary potentially harmful substance is in your fish is because they make more money off you by feeding you fillers.

If that isn't worth .80 a can, I don't know what is!

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Sugarcube, I think you're right.

 

Which is unfortunate in a way for me, as I was trying to use Salmon to keep my food costs a tad lower.  Oh well, I realized my grocery bill was going to go up on W30. 

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