What Is Your Go-To Knife for Prep Work?


tarheelpo

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Good morning W30ers.  I have a decent set of knives from a department store but am looking to get a step up and purchase a nice knife to use for my primary veggie/meat prep knife.  Some people are santoku fans, some chef fans.  I've been on youtube and seen Alton Brown recommend Shun.  Heard good things about Wusthof, Henckels, KIWI, Victorinox, all the way to Target's Kitchen Aid line.  I primarily use carrots, celery, zucchini, bellpepper, spinach, and sweet potato as veggies.  

SO:

 

1. What style do you use? (Chef, Satoku, etc.)

2. Length?

3. Brand?

 

Looking forward to an engaging discussion on this highly personal preference topic.  Thanks!!

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I have a set of Wustof Classic and use 2 primarily - the 6 inch sandwich knife - thinner bladed and not serrated; and the 8 inch chefs knife.  We have the smallest set they offer and then supplemented it with the steak knife set.  I love my knives nearly as much as I love my CATS!  For the amount of cooking I do, it is crazy that I waited as long as I did to get them. 

 

My husband did a lot of research & he found two brands that stood out for him...Wustof and Hinkles...then we went to Williams Sonoma and played with them...WS was very helpful and taught us the difference between sharpening and honing - who knew??  Mostly I learned that all of the better knife companies have 3 or 4 "levels" of knives and the middle one was worth the money for us. What fits well in your hand is the brand you should buy.  The better brands are all comparable...

 

My husband has a client that owns a knife store and the other thing he felt was important was to be careful what you purchase...there is very little discernible difference online with knives - its just a photo.  So his advice was to buy from a reputable store if you purchase online - fakes are out there...

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I pretty much use my 8 inch chef's knife exclusively. I only have 5 knives, 2 chef and 3 non-serrated steak knives that I use as pairing knives. I lost any others that came with my knife set (Had it like 10 years). IMO, nothing beats a chefs knife for chopping anything. It looks like a santoku knife is almost the same as a chef's knife, only the blade doesn't taper the same way. I prefer the curve of the tip of the blade on a chefs knife as it allows that rocking motion for dicing smaller items. For brand, I just have a farberware from walmart. I'd really like to get a higher quality one and I've also heard good things about wustof, but haven't had a chance to try them out.

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I have messermiester st moritz knives. In was actually in culinary school when I got them. They were cheaper then the wustoffs. (Total brainfart before I edited) 6 inch chef 8inch chef, serrated bread knife, paring knife and boning knife. I also bought a Japanese style vegetable knife to supplement the set. I don't use it that much tho.

I think I paid 300 for the set ten years ago. I love them. I love the 8 inch chef I use it all the time. Paring knife I use for small things like taking the tops off strawberries, peeling, small handiwork etc.

I use the boning knife for trimming meat and skinning fish. I'm super picky about veins, silverskin etc on my meat. Sometimes I use it for deboning but I usually do that with a chef knife or kitchen shears.

Serrated knife is for slicing roasts and really soft tomatoes. And bread for my hubby :-[

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Anyone looking for budget-conscious knives, look in catering stores, which are where chefs and restaurants buy the gear they use daily.

 

Often the best value are "vegetable knives", which are small, very sharp and usually dishwasher safe. They are too small for things like cutting large items (big pumpkins), but they're usually unbeatable value (I've found them for AU$2 - stainless steel).

 

If you're spending big amounts on a fancy knife, check more than the brand. Many fancy brands have multiple products, some which appear identical visually. One example is Global, the cheaper retail versions (not cheap) are made from multiple pieces of metal fused together, the expensive ones are not. The price difference is massive, single piece ones are way outside the budget of most people.

 

Safety tip - knife accidents are more common with blunt knives (too much pressure, slipping), a cheap knife which is sharpened often may be safer than an expensive knife that isn't sharpened.

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  • 1 year later...

Hello Everyone,

 I love to do collection of different types of knives and their compatible knife sharpeners. I like to have knowledge about knife sharpeners and to discuss with others for sharing information to achieve more knowledge.Personally , I am using  MAC MTH-80 8-inch chef's knife with dimples. 

mac_mth80_mac1_3.png

MAC MTH-80 8-inch chef's knife with dimples is the best for most home cooks. This Japanese-made stamped knife was, hands down, the sharpest, most durable, and most comfortable model we tested. Its razor-sharp blade diced onions, turned bulk carrots into classic French cuts, and sliced through tough butternut squash better than any other knife we tried. It even cut through delicate basil without causing the edges to brown—something none of the German knives could equal. Its durable high-carbon blade will also stay sharp longer than almost any other knife blade we found at this price range. At $145, it’s not cheap. But we think its combination of performance, durability, and comfort make it an investment that could last a lifetime. From that perspective, it’s a bargain.I checked reviews of knives from  http://www.recipetips.com/kitchen-tips/t--1075/types-of-kitchen-knives.asp  . Moreover, for maintenance of my  knives  , I use to keep them  sharp . For sharpening I am using  Chef's Choice 120 Diamond Hone 3- stage Professional Knife sharpener.It has a three stage sharpening process which flips on and off with a switch. The unique trizor plus edge provides with durability and sharpness to its maximum. It has a three years warranty. It works for sharpening of chef, butcher, hunting and pocket knives of all weights and brands.Works best with chef’s knives & butcher knives,100% Diamond abrasive,Unique Trizor-Plus edge offers superb sharpness. I think it is the best knife sharpener . Before purchasing I checked its review from electric knife sharpener as we have to spend lots of our precious money on it.Finally I am happy with its performance.  

And according to the budget point of view I think victorinox Fibrox 8" is best on the price basis.victorinox is a  8-inch multipurpose chef's knife designed for chopping, mincing, slicing, and dicing.I am having this knife also.High-carbon stainless steel blade provides maximum sharpness and edge retention. Blade is conical ground lengthwise and crosswise for minimal resistance while cutting, laser tested to ensure optimum cutting power. Patented 2-inch Fibrox handle is textured, slip resistant, and ergonomically designed.It is Hand washing recommended, lifetime warranty.

Thank you

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  • Whole30 Certified Coach

 

And according to the budget point of view I think victorinox Fibrox 8" is best on the price basis.victorinox is a  8-inch multipurpose chef's knife designed for chopping, mincing, slicing, and dicing.I am having this knife also.High-carbon stainless steel blade provides maximum sharpness and edge retention. Blade is conical ground lengthwise and crosswise for minimal resistance while cutting, laser tested to ensure optimum cutting power. Patented 2-inch Fibrox handle is textured, slip resistant, and ergonomically designed.It is Hand washing recommended, lifetime warranty.

Thank you

 

We just got our first Fibrox 10" a few months ago.  LOVE it.  Just bought an 8".  I have a lot more room in my utensil drawer now - all the crappy knives went in the trash!  They were $40ish, but worth it.

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